Proton exchange as a relaxation mechanism for T₁ in the rotating frame in native and immobilized protein solutions

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Proton exchange as a relaxation mechanism for T₁ in the rotating frame in native and immobilized protein solutions. / Makela, HI; Grohn, OHJ; Kettunen, MI; Kauppinen, Risto.

In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 289, 01.12.2001, p. 813-818.

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@article{819badaee3744583b95c5579377b5715,
title = "Proton exchange as a relaxation mechanism for T₁ in the rotating frame in native and immobilized protein solutions",
abstract = "T1 relaxation in the rotating frame (T1rho) is a sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast for acute brain insults. Biophysical mechanisms affecting T1rho relaxation rate (R1rho) and R1rho dispersion (dependency of R1rho on the spin-lock field) were studied in protein solutions by varying their chemical environment and pH in native, heat-denatured, and glutaraldehyde (GA) cross-linked samples. Low pH strongly reduced R1rho in heat-denatured phantoms displaying proton resonances from a number of side-chain chemical groups in high-resolution 1H NMR spectra. At pH of 5.5, R1rho dispersion was completely absent. In contrast, in the GA-treated phantoms with very few NMR visible side chain groups, acidic pH showed virtually no effect on R1rho. The present data point to a crucial role of proton exchange on R1rho and R1rho dispersion in immobilized protein solution mimicking tissue relaxation properties.",
author = "HI Makela and OHJ Grohn and MI Kettunen and Risto Kauppinen",
year = "2001",
month = dec,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1006/bbrc.2001.6058",
language = "English",
volume = "289",
pages = "813--818",
journal = "Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications",
issn = "0006-291X",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Proton exchange as a relaxation mechanism for T₁ in the rotating frame in native and immobilized protein solutions

AU - Makela, HI

AU - Grohn, OHJ

AU - Kettunen, MI

AU - Kauppinen, Risto

PY - 2001/12/1

Y1 - 2001/12/1

N2 - T1 relaxation in the rotating frame (T1rho) is a sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast for acute brain insults. Biophysical mechanisms affecting T1rho relaxation rate (R1rho) and R1rho dispersion (dependency of R1rho on the spin-lock field) were studied in protein solutions by varying their chemical environment and pH in native, heat-denatured, and glutaraldehyde (GA) cross-linked samples. Low pH strongly reduced R1rho in heat-denatured phantoms displaying proton resonances from a number of side-chain chemical groups in high-resolution 1H NMR spectra. At pH of 5.5, R1rho dispersion was completely absent. In contrast, in the GA-treated phantoms with very few NMR visible side chain groups, acidic pH showed virtually no effect on R1rho. The present data point to a crucial role of proton exchange on R1rho and R1rho dispersion in immobilized protein solution mimicking tissue relaxation properties.

AB - T1 relaxation in the rotating frame (T1rho) is a sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast for acute brain insults. Biophysical mechanisms affecting T1rho relaxation rate (R1rho) and R1rho dispersion (dependency of R1rho on the spin-lock field) were studied in protein solutions by varying their chemical environment and pH in native, heat-denatured, and glutaraldehyde (GA) cross-linked samples. Low pH strongly reduced R1rho in heat-denatured phantoms displaying proton resonances from a number of side-chain chemical groups in high-resolution 1H NMR spectra. At pH of 5.5, R1rho dispersion was completely absent. In contrast, in the GA-treated phantoms with very few NMR visible side chain groups, acidic pH showed virtually no effect on R1rho. The present data point to a crucial role of proton exchange on R1rho and R1rho dispersion in immobilized protein solution mimicking tissue relaxation properties.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035861921&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1006/bbrc.2001.6058

DO - 10.1006/bbrc.2001.6058

M3 - Article

C2 - 11735118

VL - 289

SP - 813

EP - 818

JO - Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications

JF - Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications

SN - 0006-291X

ER -