Prolonged treatment with vitamin D in postmenopausal women with primary hyperparathyroidism

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Prolonged treatment with vitamin D in postmenopausal women with primary hyperparathyroidism. / Rao, Ranganathan R; Randeva, Harpal S; Sankaranarayanan, Sailesh; Narashima, Murthy; Möhlig, Matthias; Mehanna, Hisham; Weickert, Martin O.

In: Endocrine Connections, Vol. 1, No. 1, 01.07.2012, p. 13-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Rao, RR, Randeva, HS, Sankaranarayanan, S, Narashima, M, Möhlig, M, Mehanna, H & Weickert, MO 2012, 'Prolonged treatment with vitamin D in postmenopausal women with primary hyperparathyroidism', Endocrine Connections, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 13-21. https://doi.org/10.1530/EC-12-0008

APA

Rao, R. R., Randeva, H. S., Sankaranarayanan, S., Narashima, M., Möhlig, M., Mehanna, H., & Weickert, M. O. (2012). Prolonged treatment with vitamin D in postmenopausal women with primary hyperparathyroidism. Endocrine Connections, 1(1), 13-21. https://doi.org/10.1530/EC-12-0008

Vancouver

Author

Rao, Ranganathan R ; Randeva, Harpal S ; Sankaranarayanan, Sailesh ; Narashima, Murthy ; Möhlig, Matthias ; Mehanna, Hisham ; Weickert, Martin O. / Prolonged treatment with vitamin D in postmenopausal women with primary hyperparathyroidism. In: Endocrine Connections. 2012 ; Vol. 1, No. 1. pp. 13-21.

Bibtex

@article{4f46e773f0fb4698b263370a9d8dc41f,
title = "Prolonged treatment with vitamin D in postmenopausal women with primary hyperparathyroidism",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency further increases circulating parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT), with potential detrimental effects on bone mass.METHODS: This was an observational clinical study in consecutive conservatively treated postmenopausal women (n=40) with pHPT and coexistent 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency (25OHD ≤50 nmol/l (≤20 ng/ml)). Patients who showed an increase in serum 25OHD above the threshold of vitamin D deficiency (>50 nmol/l; n=28) using treatment with various commonly prescribed vitamin D preparations were, for the purposes of statistical analyses, allocated to the treatment group. Patients who were retrospectively identified as having received no treatment with vitamin D and/or remained vitamin D deficient were considered as non-responders/controls (n=12). Adjusted calcium (adjCa), PTH and 25OHD concentrations were monitored in all subjects up to 54 months (mean observation period of 18±2 months).RESULTS: Prolonged increased vitamin D intake, regardless of the source (serum 25OHD, increase from 32.2±1.7 nmol/l at baseline to 136.4±11.6 nmol/l, P<0.0001), significantly reduced serum PTH (13.3±1.1 vs 10.5±1.0 pmol/l, P=0.0001), with no adverse effects on adjCa levels (2.60±0.03 vs 2.60±0.02 mmol/l, P=0.77) and renal function tests (P>0.73). In contrast, serum PTH remained unchanged (15.8±2.6 vs 16.3±1.9 pmol/l, P=0.64) in patients who remained vitamin D deficient, with a significant difference between groups in changes of PTH (P=0.0003). Intrapartial correlation analyses showed an independent negative correlation of changes in 25OHD with PTH levels (r ic=-0.41, P=0.014).CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged treatment with vitamin D in various commonly prescribed preparations appeared to be safe and significantly reduced PTH levels by 21%.",
author = "Rao, {Ranganathan R} and Randeva, {Harpal S} and Sailesh Sankaranarayanan and Murthy Narashima and Matthias M{\"o}hlig and Hisham Mehanna and Weickert, {Martin O}",
year = "2012",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1530/EC-12-0008",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
pages = "13--21",
journal = "Endocrine Connections",
issn = "2049-3614",
publisher = "BioScientifica",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prolonged treatment with vitamin D in postmenopausal women with primary hyperparathyroidism

AU - Rao, Ranganathan R

AU - Randeva, Harpal S

AU - Sankaranarayanan, Sailesh

AU - Narashima, Murthy

AU - Möhlig, Matthias

AU - Mehanna, Hisham

AU - Weickert, Martin O

PY - 2012/7/1

Y1 - 2012/7/1

N2 - INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency further increases circulating parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT), with potential detrimental effects on bone mass.METHODS: This was an observational clinical study in consecutive conservatively treated postmenopausal women (n=40) with pHPT and coexistent 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency (25OHD ≤50 nmol/l (≤20 ng/ml)). Patients who showed an increase in serum 25OHD above the threshold of vitamin D deficiency (>50 nmol/l; n=28) using treatment with various commonly prescribed vitamin D preparations were, for the purposes of statistical analyses, allocated to the treatment group. Patients who were retrospectively identified as having received no treatment with vitamin D and/or remained vitamin D deficient were considered as non-responders/controls (n=12). Adjusted calcium (adjCa), PTH and 25OHD concentrations were monitored in all subjects up to 54 months (mean observation period of 18±2 months).RESULTS: Prolonged increased vitamin D intake, regardless of the source (serum 25OHD, increase from 32.2±1.7 nmol/l at baseline to 136.4±11.6 nmol/l, P<0.0001), significantly reduced serum PTH (13.3±1.1 vs 10.5±1.0 pmol/l, P=0.0001), with no adverse effects on adjCa levels (2.60±0.03 vs 2.60±0.02 mmol/l, P=0.77) and renal function tests (P>0.73). In contrast, serum PTH remained unchanged (15.8±2.6 vs 16.3±1.9 pmol/l, P=0.64) in patients who remained vitamin D deficient, with a significant difference between groups in changes of PTH (P=0.0003). Intrapartial correlation analyses showed an independent negative correlation of changes in 25OHD with PTH levels (r ic=-0.41, P=0.014).CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged treatment with vitamin D in various commonly prescribed preparations appeared to be safe and significantly reduced PTH levels by 21%.

AB - INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency further increases circulating parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT), with potential detrimental effects on bone mass.METHODS: This was an observational clinical study in consecutive conservatively treated postmenopausal women (n=40) with pHPT and coexistent 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency (25OHD ≤50 nmol/l (≤20 ng/ml)). Patients who showed an increase in serum 25OHD above the threshold of vitamin D deficiency (>50 nmol/l; n=28) using treatment with various commonly prescribed vitamin D preparations were, for the purposes of statistical analyses, allocated to the treatment group. Patients who were retrospectively identified as having received no treatment with vitamin D and/or remained vitamin D deficient were considered as non-responders/controls (n=12). Adjusted calcium (adjCa), PTH and 25OHD concentrations were monitored in all subjects up to 54 months (mean observation period of 18±2 months).RESULTS: Prolonged increased vitamin D intake, regardless of the source (serum 25OHD, increase from 32.2±1.7 nmol/l at baseline to 136.4±11.6 nmol/l, P<0.0001), significantly reduced serum PTH (13.3±1.1 vs 10.5±1.0 pmol/l, P=0.0001), with no adverse effects on adjCa levels (2.60±0.03 vs 2.60±0.02 mmol/l, P=0.77) and renal function tests (P>0.73). In contrast, serum PTH remained unchanged (15.8±2.6 vs 16.3±1.9 pmol/l, P=0.64) in patients who remained vitamin D deficient, with a significant difference between groups in changes of PTH (P=0.0003). Intrapartial correlation analyses showed an independent negative correlation of changes in 25OHD with PTH levels (r ic=-0.41, P=0.014).CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged treatment with vitamin D in various commonly prescribed preparations appeared to be safe and significantly reduced PTH levels by 21%.

U2 - 10.1530/EC-12-0008

DO - 10.1530/EC-12-0008

M3 - Article

C2 - 23781299

VL - 1

SP - 13

EP - 21

JO - Endocrine Connections

JF - Endocrine Connections

SN - 2049-3614

IS - 1

ER -