Processing of zero-derived words in English : an fMRI investigation

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Processing of zero-derived words in English : an fMRI investigation. / Pliatsikas, Christos; Wheeldon, Linda; Lahiri, A; Hansen, Peter.

In: Neuropsychologia, Vol. 51, No. 14, 01.2014, p. 47–53.

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@article{804bb415aeec492f8362501423a16008,
title = "Processing of zero-derived words in English : an fMRI investigation",
abstract = "Derivational morphological processes allow us to create new words (e.g. punish (V) to noun (N) punishment) from base forms. The number of steps from the basic units to derived words often varies (e.g., nationalitybridge-V) i.e., zero-derivation ( Aronoff, 1980). We compared the processing of one-step (soaking<soak-V) and two-step (bridging<bridge-V<bridge-N) derivations together with monomorphemic control words (grumble) in an fMRI experiment. Participants were presented with derived forms of words (soaking, bridging) in a lexical decision task. Although the surface derived -ing forms can be contextually participles, gerunds, or even nouns, they are all derived from verbs since the suffix -ing can only be attached to verb roots. Crucially, the verb root is the basic form for the one-step words, whereas for the two-step words the verb root is zero derived from a basic noun. Significantly increased brain activity was observed for complex (one-step and two-step) versus simple (zero-step) forms in regions involved in morphological processing, such as the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG). Critically, activation was also more pronounced for two-step compared to one-step forms. Since both types of derived words have the same surface structure, our findings suggest that morphological processing is based on underlying morphological complexity, independent of overt affixation. This study is the first to provide evidence for the processing of zero derivation, and demonstrates that morphological processing cannot be reduced to surface form-based segmentation.",
keywords = "Morphology, Functional, Zero derivation, LIFG",
author = "Christos Pliatsikas and Linda Wheeldon and A Lahiri and Peter Hansen",
year = "2014",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2013.11.003",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "47–53",
journal = "Neuropsychologia",
issn = "0028-3932",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "14",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Processing of zero-derived words in English : an fMRI investigation

AU - Pliatsikas, Christos

AU - Wheeldon, Linda

AU - Lahiri, A

AU - Hansen, Peter

PY - 2014/1

Y1 - 2014/1

N2 - Derivational morphological processes allow us to create new words (e.g. punish (V) to noun (N) punishment) from base forms. The number of steps from the basic units to derived words often varies (e.g., nationalitybridge-V) i.e., zero-derivation ( Aronoff, 1980). We compared the processing of one-step (soaking<soak-V) and two-step (bridging<bridge-V<bridge-N) derivations together with monomorphemic control words (grumble) in an fMRI experiment. Participants were presented with derived forms of words (soaking, bridging) in a lexical decision task. Although the surface derived -ing forms can be contextually participles, gerunds, or even nouns, they are all derived from verbs since the suffix -ing can only be attached to verb roots. Crucially, the verb root is the basic form for the one-step words, whereas for the two-step words the verb root is zero derived from a basic noun. Significantly increased brain activity was observed for complex (one-step and two-step) versus simple (zero-step) forms in regions involved in morphological processing, such as the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG). Critically, activation was also more pronounced for two-step compared to one-step forms. Since both types of derived words have the same surface structure, our findings suggest that morphological processing is based on underlying morphological complexity, independent of overt affixation. This study is the first to provide evidence for the processing of zero derivation, and demonstrates that morphological processing cannot be reduced to surface form-based segmentation.

AB - Derivational morphological processes allow us to create new words (e.g. punish (V) to noun (N) punishment) from base forms. The number of steps from the basic units to derived words often varies (e.g., nationalitybridge-V) i.e., zero-derivation ( Aronoff, 1980). We compared the processing of one-step (soaking<soak-V) and two-step (bridging<bridge-V<bridge-N) derivations together with monomorphemic control words (grumble) in an fMRI experiment. Participants were presented with derived forms of words (soaking, bridging) in a lexical decision task. Although the surface derived -ing forms can be contextually participles, gerunds, or even nouns, they are all derived from verbs since the suffix -ing can only be attached to verb roots. Crucially, the verb root is the basic form for the one-step words, whereas for the two-step words the verb root is zero derived from a basic noun. Significantly increased brain activity was observed for complex (one-step and two-step) versus simple (zero-step) forms in regions involved in morphological processing, such as the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG). Critically, activation was also more pronounced for two-step compared to one-step forms. Since both types of derived words have the same surface structure, our findings suggest that morphological processing is based on underlying morphological complexity, independent of overt affixation. This study is the first to provide evidence for the processing of zero derivation, and demonstrates that morphological processing cannot be reduced to surface form-based segmentation.

KW - Morphology

KW - Functional

KW - Zero derivation

KW - LIFG

U2 - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2013.11.003

DO - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2013.11.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 24246693

VL - 51

SP - 47

EP - 53

JO - Neuropsychologia

JF - Neuropsychologia

SN - 0028-3932

IS - 14

ER -