Pre-hospital administration of tranexamic acid in trauma patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis

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Pre-hospital administration of tranexamic acid in trauma patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis. / Alhenaki, Abdulrahman M; Ali, Ayesha S; Kadir, Bryar; Ahmed, Zubair.

In: Trauma, 27.03.2021.

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@article{9c64a9ca40ea4093a21a294f80b553be,
title = "Pre-hospital administration of tranexamic acid in trauma patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "BackgroundThe Clinical Randomization of an Antifibrinolytic in Significant Hemorrhage-2 (CRASH-2) trial proved that tranexamic acid (TXA) is a time-dependent drug, having a better outcome if given within 1-hour of injury. In order to test this theory, studies have been conducted to examine the effect of TXA in the pre-hospital setting. We conducted a systematic search and meta-analysis to evaluate the role of TXA administration in the civilian pre-hospital setting on patient outcomes.MethodsEmbase, Medline, CINAHL and Cochrane were searched for randomized control trials (RCTs), retrospective, and prospective studies that examined the effect of TXA on patients in the pre-hospital setting versus a control group. Outcome measures were overall mortality rate and thromboembolic events. Two authors extracted the data independently. To appraise the included studies, we used the NIH quality assessment tool for cohort and cross-sectional studies. Results are presented as Risk Ratio (RR), a random-effect model was implemented, and the I2 test was used to assess heterogeneity.ResultsThe search identified 1886 papers, but only five retrospective studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were selected for further analysis. A meta-analysis confirmed that TXA reduced the overall mortality rate (pooled risk ratio of 0.74 (95% CI 0.45, 1.25)) and thromboembolic events (risk ratio of 0.71 (95% CI 0.35, 1.44)).ConclusionThe pooled effects for both outcome measures favour the administration of TXA in the pre-hospital setting, although none of the findings reported a significant effect. Our study highlights the need for additional high-quality evidence to validate the significance of these findings.Level of evidenceLevel III, therapeutic study.",
keywords = "Prehospital setting, tranexamic acid, trauma, mortality, thromboembolic events",
author = "Alhenaki, {Abdulrahman M} and Ali, {Ayesha S} and Bryar Kadir and Zubair Ahmed",
year = "2021",
month = mar,
day = "27",
doi = "10.1177/14604086211001163",
language = "English",
journal = "Trauma",
issn = "1460-4086",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pre-hospital administration of tranexamic acid in trauma patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis

AU - Alhenaki, Abdulrahman M

AU - Ali, Ayesha S

AU - Kadir, Bryar

AU - Ahmed, Zubair

PY - 2021/3/27

Y1 - 2021/3/27

N2 - BackgroundThe Clinical Randomization of an Antifibrinolytic in Significant Hemorrhage-2 (CRASH-2) trial proved that tranexamic acid (TXA) is a time-dependent drug, having a better outcome if given within 1-hour of injury. In order to test this theory, studies have been conducted to examine the effect of TXA in the pre-hospital setting. We conducted a systematic search and meta-analysis to evaluate the role of TXA administration in the civilian pre-hospital setting on patient outcomes.MethodsEmbase, Medline, CINAHL and Cochrane were searched for randomized control trials (RCTs), retrospective, and prospective studies that examined the effect of TXA on patients in the pre-hospital setting versus a control group. Outcome measures were overall mortality rate and thromboembolic events. Two authors extracted the data independently. To appraise the included studies, we used the NIH quality assessment tool for cohort and cross-sectional studies. Results are presented as Risk Ratio (RR), a random-effect model was implemented, and the I2 test was used to assess heterogeneity.ResultsThe search identified 1886 papers, but only five retrospective studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were selected for further analysis. A meta-analysis confirmed that TXA reduced the overall mortality rate (pooled risk ratio of 0.74 (95% CI 0.45, 1.25)) and thromboembolic events (risk ratio of 0.71 (95% CI 0.35, 1.44)).ConclusionThe pooled effects for both outcome measures favour the administration of TXA in the pre-hospital setting, although none of the findings reported a significant effect. Our study highlights the need for additional high-quality evidence to validate the significance of these findings.Level of evidenceLevel III, therapeutic study.

AB - BackgroundThe Clinical Randomization of an Antifibrinolytic in Significant Hemorrhage-2 (CRASH-2) trial proved that tranexamic acid (TXA) is a time-dependent drug, having a better outcome if given within 1-hour of injury. In order to test this theory, studies have been conducted to examine the effect of TXA in the pre-hospital setting. We conducted a systematic search and meta-analysis to evaluate the role of TXA administration in the civilian pre-hospital setting on patient outcomes.MethodsEmbase, Medline, CINAHL and Cochrane were searched for randomized control trials (RCTs), retrospective, and prospective studies that examined the effect of TXA on patients in the pre-hospital setting versus a control group. Outcome measures were overall mortality rate and thromboembolic events. Two authors extracted the data independently. To appraise the included studies, we used the NIH quality assessment tool for cohort and cross-sectional studies. Results are presented as Risk Ratio (RR), a random-effect model was implemented, and the I2 test was used to assess heterogeneity.ResultsThe search identified 1886 papers, but only five retrospective studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were selected for further analysis. A meta-analysis confirmed that TXA reduced the overall mortality rate (pooled risk ratio of 0.74 (95% CI 0.45, 1.25)) and thromboembolic events (risk ratio of 0.71 (95% CI 0.35, 1.44)).ConclusionThe pooled effects for both outcome measures favour the administration of TXA in the pre-hospital setting, although none of the findings reported a significant effect. Our study highlights the need for additional high-quality evidence to validate the significance of these findings.Level of evidenceLevel III, therapeutic study.

KW - Prehospital setting

KW - tranexamic acid

KW - trauma

KW - mortality

KW - thromboembolic events

U2 - 10.1177/14604086211001163

DO - 10.1177/14604086211001163

M3 - Article

JO - Trauma

JF - Trauma

SN - 1460-4086

ER -