Phenomenology of self-restraint

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Authors

Colleges, School and Institutes

Abstract

Self-restraint is often reported in individuals with mental retardation who show self-injurious behavior (SIB). In this study, the phenomenology and prevalence of self-restraint in individuals showing self-injury and wearing protective devices and those showing self-injury but not wearing protective devices were compared. A high prevalence of self-restraint in the whole sample of individuals showing self-injury was identified (67/88, 76.1%), and self-restraint was more prevalent in a group showing self-injury but not wearing protective devices (43/47, 91.5%) than in a group showing self-injury and wearing protective devices (24/41, 58.5%). Individuals not wearing protective devices showed a greater number of topographies of self-restraint than those who did wear them. Results are discussed with reference to the purely topographical definition of self-restraint employed and the potential equivalence of protective devices and self-restraint.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-81
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal on Mental Retardation
Volume108
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2003