Personalisation: the emerging revised code of education?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Personalisation: the emerging revised code of education? / Hartley, David.

In: Oxford Review of Education, Vol. 33, No. 5, 01.01.2007, p. 629-642.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{b522c5f2ed73452d8d1d25997bc7d189,
title = "Personalisation: the emerging revised code of education?",
abstract = "In England, a 'revised' educational code appears to be emerging. It centres upon the concept of 'personalisation'. Its basis is less in educational theory, more in contemporary marketing theory. Personalisation can be regarded in two ways. First, it provides the rationale for a new mode of public-service delivery, one which seeks to enable 'users' to co-produce with professionals a solution to their needs. In this endeavour, it takes further that process of marketisation which had been set in train under the New Public Management. Second, it portends a new 'grammar' for the school, in the guise of 'personalised learning'. At this stage, what shall count as personalisation-particularly in relation to personalised learning-remains incoherent and inchoate. For its justification as a policy, personalisation appeals to child-centredness, to democracy and to consumerism. The analysis draws on contemporary social and marketing theory.",
author = "David Hartley",
year = "2007",
month = jan,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/03054980701476311",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "629--642",
journal = "Oxford Review of Education",
issn = "0305-4985",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Personalisation: the emerging revised code of education?

AU - Hartley, David

PY - 2007/1/1

Y1 - 2007/1/1

N2 - In England, a 'revised' educational code appears to be emerging. It centres upon the concept of 'personalisation'. Its basis is less in educational theory, more in contemporary marketing theory. Personalisation can be regarded in two ways. First, it provides the rationale for a new mode of public-service delivery, one which seeks to enable 'users' to co-produce with professionals a solution to their needs. In this endeavour, it takes further that process of marketisation which had been set in train under the New Public Management. Second, it portends a new 'grammar' for the school, in the guise of 'personalised learning'. At this stage, what shall count as personalisation-particularly in relation to personalised learning-remains incoherent and inchoate. For its justification as a policy, personalisation appeals to child-centredness, to democracy and to consumerism. The analysis draws on contemporary social and marketing theory.

AB - In England, a 'revised' educational code appears to be emerging. It centres upon the concept of 'personalisation'. Its basis is less in educational theory, more in contemporary marketing theory. Personalisation can be regarded in two ways. First, it provides the rationale for a new mode of public-service delivery, one which seeks to enable 'users' to co-produce with professionals a solution to their needs. In this endeavour, it takes further that process of marketisation which had been set in train under the New Public Management. Second, it portends a new 'grammar' for the school, in the guise of 'personalised learning'. At this stage, what shall count as personalisation-particularly in relation to personalised learning-remains incoherent and inchoate. For its justification as a policy, personalisation appeals to child-centredness, to democracy and to consumerism. The analysis draws on contemporary social and marketing theory.

U2 - 10.1080/03054980701476311

DO - 10.1080/03054980701476311

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 629

EP - 642

JO - Oxford Review of Education

JF - Oxford Review of Education

SN - 0305-4985

IS - 5

ER -