Persistence of self-injurious behaviour in autism spectrum disorder over 3 years: a prospective cohort study of risk markers

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@article{b9a0929f76cb464e8a0747d95dc8c563,
title = "Persistence of self-injurious behaviour in autism spectrum disorder over 3 years: a prospective cohort study of risk markers",
abstract = "BackgroundThere are few studies documenting the persistence of self-injury in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and consequently limited data on behavioural and demographic characteristics associated with persistence. In this longitudinal study, we investigated self-injury in a cohort of individuals with ASD over 3 years to identify behavioural and demographic characteristics associated with persistence.MethodsCarers of 67 individuals with ASD (Median age of individuals with ASD in years = 13.5, Interquartile Range = 10.00–17.00), completed questionnaires relating to the presence and topography of self-injury at T1 and three years later at T2. Analyses were conducted to evaluate the persistence of self-injury and to evaluate the behavioural and demographic characteristics associated with persistence of self-injury.ResultsAt T2 self-injurious behaviour had persisted in 77.8 {\%} of individuals. Behavioural correlates of being non-verbal, having lower ability and higher levels of overactivity, impulsivity and repetitive behaviour, were associated with self-injury at both time points. Risk markers of impulsivity (p = 0.021) and deficits in social interaction (p = 0.026) at T1 were associated with the persistence of self-injury over 3 years.ConclusionsImpulsivity and deficits in social interaction are associated with persistent self-injury in ASD and thus may act as behavioural risk markers. The identification of these risk markers evidences a role for behaviour dysregulation in the development and maintenance of self-injury. The findings have clinical implications for proactive intervention; these behavioural characteristics may be utilised to identify ‘at risk’ individuals for whom self-injury is likely to be persistent and therefore those individuals for whom early intervention may be most warranted.",
author = "Caroline Richards and Joanna Moss and Lisa Nelson and Christopher Oliver",
year = "2016",
month = "5",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1186/s11689-016-9153-x",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders",
issn = "1866-1955",
publisher = "Springer",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Persistence of self-injurious behaviour in autism spectrum disorder over 3 years: a prospective cohort study of risk markers

AU - Richards, Caroline

AU - Moss, Joanna

AU - Nelson, Lisa

AU - Oliver, Christopher

PY - 2016/5/5

Y1 - 2016/5/5

N2 - BackgroundThere are few studies documenting the persistence of self-injury in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and consequently limited data on behavioural and demographic characteristics associated with persistence. In this longitudinal study, we investigated self-injury in a cohort of individuals with ASD over 3 years to identify behavioural and demographic characteristics associated with persistence.MethodsCarers of 67 individuals with ASD (Median age of individuals with ASD in years = 13.5, Interquartile Range = 10.00–17.00), completed questionnaires relating to the presence and topography of self-injury at T1 and three years later at T2. Analyses were conducted to evaluate the persistence of self-injury and to evaluate the behavioural and demographic characteristics associated with persistence of self-injury.ResultsAt T2 self-injurious behaviour had persisted in 77.8 % of individuals. Behavioural correlates of being non-verbal, having lower ability and higher levels of overactivity, impulsivity and repetitive behaviour, were associated with self-injury at both time points. Risk markers of impulsivity (p = 0.021) and deficits in social interaction (p = 0.026) at T1 were associated with the persistence of self-injury over 3 years.ConclusionsImpulsivity and deficits in social interaction are associated with persistent self-injury in ASD and thus may act as behavioural risk markers. The identification of these risk markers evidences a role for behaviour dysregulation in the development and maintenance of self-injury. The findings have clinical implications for proactive intervention; these behavioural characteristics may be utilised to identify ‘at risk’ individuals for whom self-injury is likely to be persistent and therefore those individuals for whom early intervention may be most warranted.

AB - BackgroundThere are few studies documenting the persistence of self-injury in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and consequently limited data on behavioural and demographic characteristics associated with persistence. In this longitudinal study, we investigated self-injury in a cohort of individuals with ASD over 3 years to identify behavioural and demographic characteristics associated with persistence.MethodsCarers of 67 individuals with ASD (Median age of individuals with ASD in years = 13.5, Interquartile Range = 10.00–17.00), completed questionnaires relating to the presence and topography of self-injury at T1 and three years later at T2. Analyses were conducted to evaluate the persistence of self-injury and to evaluate the behavioural and demographic characteristics associated with persistence of self-injury.ResultsAt T2 self-injurious behaviour had persisted in 77.8 % of individuals. Behavioural correlates of being non-verbal, having lower ability and higher levels of overactivity, impulsivity and repetitive behaviour, were associated with self-injury at both time points. Risk markers of impulsivity (p = 0.021) and deficits in social interaction (p = 0.026) at T1 were associated with the persistence of self-injury over 3 years.ConclusionsImpulsivity and deficits in social interaction are associated with persistent self-injury in ASD and thus may act as behavioural risk markers. The identification of these risk markers evidences a role for behaviour dysregulation in the development and maintenance of self-injury. The findings have clinical implications for proactive intervention; these behavioural characteristics may be utilised to identify ‘at risk’ individuals for whom self-injury is likely to be persistent and therefore those individuals for whom early intervention may be most warranted.

U2 - 10.1186/s11689-016-9153-x

DO - 10.1186/s11689-016-9153-x

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders

JF - Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders

SN - 1866-1955

M1 - 21

ER -