One stage vertical rectus muscle recession using adjustable sutures under local anaesthesia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Authors

Colleges, School and Institutes

Abstract

AIMS: To assess the results of visual axis alignment following one stage adjustable suture surgery to correct vertical diplopia.

METHOD: Eight patients with a mean age of 44.9 years (range 16-80 years) complaining of vertical diplopia underwent rectus muscle recession under local anaesthesia with intraoperative adjustment of sutures. Diplopia was secondary to superior oblique paresis in four patients, dysthyroid eye disease in two patients, superior rectus paresis in one patient, and one developed a consecutive deviation after previous squint surgery. The surgery consisted of seven single muscle recessions (six inferior recti and one superior rectus) and one two muscle recession (inferior and lateral recti). The surgery was performed under topical anaesthesia supplemented with a subconjunctival injection of local anaesthetic over the muscle insertions.

RESULTS: The patients remained comfortable throughout their surgery. All had a reduction in their vertical deviation. Six were asymptomatic and were eventually discharged. One had residual diplopia which was well tolerated without further intervention. One had persistent troublesome diplopia which was corrected by temporary Fresnel prisms. He became asymptomatic after further surgery of a 1 mm inferior rectus advancement.

CONCLUSION: One stage adjustable suture surgery is recommended in all cases of strabismus surgery when postoperative results would otherwise be unpredictable.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)713-8
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume80
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1996

Keywords

  • Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Anesthesia, Local, Diplopia, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Oculomotor Muscles, Paresis, Surgical Procedures, Operative, Suture Techniques, Thyroid Diseases