Ocular torsion responses to electrical vestibular stimulation in Vestibular Schwannoma

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Ocular torsion responses to electrical vestibular stimulation in Vestibular Schwannoma. / Mackenzie, Stuart; Irving, Richard; Monksfield, Peter; Kumar, Raghu; Dezso, Attila; Reynolds, Raymond.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 129, No. 11, 11.2018, p. 2350-2360.

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Mackenzie, Stuart ; Irving, Richard ; Monksfield, Peter ; Kumar, Raghu ; Dezso, Attila ; Reynolds, Raymond. / Ocular torsion responses to electrical vestibular stimulation in Vestibular Schwannoma. In: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2018 ; Vol. 129, No. 11. pp. 2350-2360.

Bibtex

@article{0ca625cf092841c78a3880ff4566623d,
title = "Ocular torsion responses to electrical vestibular stimulation in Vestibular Schwannoma",
abstract = "Objectives: We determined if eye movements evoked by Electrical Vestibular Stimulation (EVS) can be used to detect vestibular dysfunction in patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma (VS).Methods: Ocular torsion responses to monaural sinusoidal EVS currents (± 2mA, 2Hz) were measured in 25 patients with tumours ranging in size from Koos grade 1 to 3. For comparative purposes we also measured postural sway response to EVS, and additionally assessed vestibular function with the lateral Head Impulse Test (HIT). Patient responses were compared to age-matched healthy control subjects.Results: Patients exhibited smaller ocular responses to ipsilesional versus contralesional EVS, and showed a larger asymmetry ratio (AR) than control subjects (19.4 vs. 3.3%, p<0.05). EVS-evoked sway responses were also smaller in ipsilesional ear, but exhibited slightly more variability than the eye movement response, along with marginally lower discriminatory power (patients vs. controls: AR=16.6 vs 2.6%, p<0.05). The HIT test exhibited no significant difference between groups.Conclusions: These results demonstrate significant deficits in the ocular torsion response to EVS in VS patients.Significance: The fast, convenient and non-invasive nature of the test are well suited to clinical use.",
keywords = "Vestibular Schwannoma, Asymmetry ratio, Electrical Vestibular Stimulation, Head Impulse Test",
author = "Stuart Mackenzie and Richard Irving and Peter Monksfield and Raghu Kumar and Attila Dezso and Raymond Reynolds",
year = "2018",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1016/j.clinph.2018.08.023",
language = "English",
volume = "129",
pages = "2350--2360",
journal = "Clinical Neurophysiology",
issn = "1388-2457",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ocular torsion responses to electrical vestibular stimulation in Vestibular Schwannoma

AU - Mackenzie, Stuart

AU - Irving, Richard

AU - Monksfield, Peter

AU - Kumar, Raghu

AU - Dezso, Attila

AU - Reynolds, Raymond

PY - 2018/11

Y1 - 2018/11

N2 - Objectives: We determined if eye movements evoked by Electrical Vestibular Stimulation (EVS) can be used to detect vestibular dysfunction in patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma (VS).Methods: Ocular torsion responses to monaural sinusoidal EVS currents (± 2mA, 2Hz) were measured in 25 patients with tumours ranging in size from Koos grade 1 to 3. For comparative purposes we also measured postural sway response to EVS, and additionally assessed vestibular function with the lateral Head Impulse Test (HIT). Patient responses were compared to age-matched healthy control subjects.Results: Patients exhibited smaller ocular responses to ipsilesional versus contralesional EVS, and showed a larger asymmetry ratio (AR) than control subjects (19.4 vs. 3.3%, p<0.05). EVS-evoked sway responses were also smaller in ipsilesional ear, but exhibited slightly more variability than the eye movement response, along with marginally lower discriminatory power (patients vs. controls: AR=16.6 vs 2.6%, p<0.05). The HIT test exhibited no significant difference between groups.Conclusions: These results demonstrate significant deficits in the ocular torsion response to EVS in VS patients.Significance: The fast, convenient and non-invasive nature of the test are well suited to clinical use.

AB - Objectives: We determined if eye movements evoked by Electrical Vestibular Stimulation (EVS) can be used to detect vestibular dysfunction in patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma (VS).Methods: Ocular torsion responses to monaural sinusoidal EVS currents (± 2mA, 2Hz) were measured in 25 patients with tumours ranging in size from Koos grade 1 to 3. For comparative purposes we also measured postural sway response to EVS, and additionally assessed vestibular function with the lateral Head Impulse Test (HIT). Patient responses were compared to age-matched healthy control subjects.Results: Patients exhibited smaller ocular responses to ipsilesional versus contralesional EVS, and showed a larger asymmetry ratio (AR) than control subjects (19.4 vs. 3.3%, p<0.05). EVS-evoked sway responses were also smaller in ipsilesional ear, but exhibited slightly more variability than the eye movement response, along with marginally lower discriminatory power (patients vs. controls: AR=16.6 vs 2.6%, p<0.05). The HIT test exhibited no significant difference between groups.Conclusions: These results demonstrate significant deficits in the ocular torsion response to EVS in VS patients.Significance: The fast, convenient and non-invasive nature of the test are well suited to clinical use.

KW - Vestibular Schwannoma

KW - Asymmetry ratio

KW - Electrical Vestibular Stimulation

KW - Head Impulse Test

U2 - 10.1016/j.clinph.2018.08.023

DO - 10.1016/j.clinph.2018.08.023

M3 - Article

C2 - 30248625

VL - 129

SP - 2350

EP - 2360

JO - Clinical Neurophysiology

JF - Clinical Neurophysiology

SN - 1388-2457

IS - 11

ER -