"Not just right experiences" in patients with Tourette syndrome: complex motor tics or compulsions?

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"Not just right experiences" in patients with Tourette syndrome : complex motor tics or compulsions? / Neal, Matthew; Cavanna, Andrea Eugenio.

In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 210, No. 2, 15.12.2013, p. 559-63.

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@article{63b1b70101cb4b61b28ddd8b0bbbe5ff,
title = "{"}Not just right experiences{"} in patients with Tourette syndrome: complex motor tics or compulsions?",
abstract = "Tourette syndrome (TS) is a chronic tic disorder often accompanied by specific obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) or full-blown obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Repetitive behaviours are commonly reported by patients with TS, who experience the urge to perform an action until it has been done {"}just right{"}. This study investigated the clinical correlates of {"}not just right experiences{"} (NJREs) in this clinical population. A standardised battery of self-report psychometric measures was administered to 71 adult patients with TS recruited from a specialist TS clinic. NJREs were systematically screened for using the Not Just Right Experiences-Questionnaire Revised (NJRE-QR). The vast majority of patients in our clinical sample (n=57, 80%) reported at least one NJRE. Patients diagnosed with TS and co-morbid OCD/OCS (n=42, 59%) reported a significantly higher number of NJREs compared to TS patients without OCD/OCS. The strongest correlation was found between NJRE-QR scores and self-report measures of compulsivity. NJREs appear to be intrinsic to the clinical phenomenology of patients with TS and can present with higher frequency in the context of co-morbid OCD/OCS, suggesting they are more related to compulsions than tics. ",
keywords = "Adult, Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/diagnosis, Comorbidity, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Obsessive Behavior/epidemiology, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/diagnosis, Personality Inventory, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Psychometrics/statistics & numerical data, Self Report, Surveys and Questionnaires, Tic Disorders/complications, Tics, Tourette Syndrome/complications, United Kingdom/epidemiology, Young Adult",
author = "Matthew Neal and Cavanna, {Andrea Eugenio}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2013",
month = dec,
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.psychres.2013.06.033",
language = "English",
volume = "210",
pages = "559--63",
journal = "Psychiatry Research",
issn = "0165-1781",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - "Not just right experiences" in patients with Tourette syndrome

T2 - complex motor tics or compulsions?

AU - Neal, Matthew

AU - Cavanna, Andrea Eugenio

N1 - Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2013/12/15

Y1 - 2013/12/15

N2 - Tourette syndrome (TS) is a chronic tic disorder often accompanied by specific obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) or full-blown obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Repetitive behaviours are commonly reported by patients with TS, who experience the urge to perform an action until it has been done "just right". This study investigated the clinical correlates of "not just right experiences" (NJREs) in this clinical population. A standardised battery of self-report psychometric measures was administered to 71 adult patients with TS recruited from a specialist TS clinic. NJREs were systematically screened for using the Not Just Right Experiences-Questionnaire Revised (NJRE-QR). The vast majority of patients in our clinical sample (n=57, 80%) reported at least one NJRE. Patients diagnosed with TS and co-morbid OCD/OCS (n=42, 59%) reported a significantly higher number of NJREs compared to TS patients without OCD/OCS. The strongest correlation was found between NJRE-QR scores and self-report measures of compulsivity. NJREs appear to be intrinsic to the clinical phenomenology of patients with TS and can present with higher frequency in the context of co-morbid OCD/OCS, suggesting they are more related to compulsions than tics.

AB - Tourette syndrome (TS) is a chronic tic disorder often accompanied by specific obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) or full-blown obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Repetitive behaviours are commonly reported by patients with TS, who experience the urge to perform an action until it has been done "just right". This study investigated the clinical correlates of "not just right experiences" (NJREs) in this clinical population. A standardised battery of self-report psychometric measures was administered to 71 adult patients with TS recruited from a specialist TS clinic. NJREs were systematically screened for using the Not Just Right Experiences-Questionnaire Revised (NJRE-QR). The vast majority of patients in our clinical sample (n=57, 80%) reported at least one NJRE. Patients diagnosed with TS and co-morbid OCD/OCS (n=42, 59%) reported a significantly higher number of NJREs compared to TS patients without OCD/OCS. The strongest correlation was found between NJRE-QR scores and self-report measures of compulsivity. NJREs appear to be intrinsic to the clinical phenomenology of patients with TS and can present with higher frequency in the context of co-morbid OCD/OCS, suggesting they are more related to compulsions than tics.

KW - Adult

KW - Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/diagnosis

KW - Comorbidity

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Obsessive Behavior/epidemiology

KW - Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/diagnosis

KW - Personality Inventory

KW - Psychiatric Status Rating Scales

KW - Psychometrics/statistics & numerical data

KW - Self Report

KW - Surveys and Questionnaires

KW - Tic Disorders/complications

KW - Tics

KW - Tourette Syndrome/complications

KW - United Kingdom/epidemiology

KW - Young Adult

U2 - 10.1016/j.psychres.2013.06.033

DO - 10.1016/j.psychres.2013.06.033

M3 - Article

C2 - 23850205

VL - 210

SP - 559

EP - 563

JO - Psychiatry Research

JF - Psychiatry Research

SN - 0165-1781

IS - 2

ER -