Non-linear associations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations with risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality: results from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database

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@article{de620fcf8c0444e58f63751419725eab,
title = "Non-linear associations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations with risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality: results from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database",
abstract = "Background: There is increasing evidence that vitamin D supplementation may only be beneficial in people with vitamin D deficiency, and the lack of sufficient people with very low vitamin D levels could explain the lack of protection against cardiovascular disease (CVD) reported in recent clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation. The aim of this study was to assess associations of low to moderate circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D with risk of incident CVD and all-cause mortality, as well as the risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), cerebrovascular disease, and heart failure separately. Methods and Results: Longitudinal analysis of electronic health records in The Health Improvement Network (THIN), a UK primary care database. The analysis included 180,263 patients age 18 years and older without a history of CVD and with circulating concentrations of 25(OH)D. After a mean follow-up of 2.2 (SD 1.7) years, there were 3747 patients diagnosed with CVD and 3912 patients died. Compared to patients in the highest quintile of 25(OHD) (≥ 67.5 nmol/L), those in the lowest 25(OH)D quintile (<23.1 nmol/L) had a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.24 (95% CI 1.12–1.38, P < 0.001) for CVD and 1.71 (1.55–1.88, P < 0.001) for mortality. The HR for both outcomes associated with 25(OH)D concentration was non-linear, being significantly increased in patients with 25(OH)D <35 nmol/L, and highest in those with 25(OH)D <25 nmol/L, although increased for mortality at 25(OH)D ≥100 nmol/L. The increased CVD HR in the lowest 25(OH)D quintile was more from IHD (1.35, 95% CI 1.13–1.60) and heart failure (1.38, 95% CI 1.08–1.77), than from cerebrovascular disease (1.13, 95% CI 0.97–1.31). Conclusion: Low 25(OH)D are associated with highest risk of CVD and mortality, and are consistent with accumulating evidence that increased risk of these diseases occurs primarily in people with vitamin D deficiency.",
keywords = "25-hydroxyvitamin D, cardiovascular disease, electronic health records, mortality, vitamin D",
author = "Francesca Crowe and Thaya Thayakaran and Neil Gittoes and Martin Hewison and Thomas, {G Neil} and Robert Scragg and Krishnarajah Nirantharakumar",
year = "2019",
month = dec,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsbmb.2019.105480",
language = "English",
volume = "195",
journal = "The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology",
issn = "0960-0760",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Non-linear associations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations with risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality

T2 - results from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database

AU - Crowe, Francesca

AU - Thayakaran, Thaya

AU - Gittoes, Neil

AU - Hewison, Martin

AU - Thomas, G Neil

AU - Scragg, Robert

AU - Nirantharakumar, Krishnarajah

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - Background: There is increasing evidence that vitamin D supplementation may only be beneficial in people with vitamin D deficiency, and the lack of sufficient people with very low vitamin D levels could explain the lack of protection against cardiovascular disease (CVD) reported in recent clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation. The aim of this study was to assess associations of low to moderate circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D with risk of incident CVD and all-cause mortality, as well as the risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), cerebrovascular disease, and heart failure separately. Methods and Results: Longitudinal analysis of electronic health records in The Health Improvement Network (THIN), a UK primary care database. The analysis included 180,263 patients age 18 years and older without a history of CVD and with circulating concentrations of 25(OH)D. After a mean follow-up of 2.2 (SD 1.7) years, there were 3747 patients diagnosed with CVD and 3912 patients died. Compared to patients in the highest quintile of 25(OHD) (≥ 67.5 nmol/L), those in the lowest 25(OH)D quintile (<23.1 nmol/L) had a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.24 (95% CI 1.12–1.38, P < 0.001) for CVD and 1.71 (1.55–1.88, P < 0.001) for mortality. The HR for both outcomes associated with 25(OH)D concentration was non-linear, being significantly increased in patients with 25(OH)D <35 nmol/L, and highest in those with 25(OH)D <25 nmol/L, although increased for mortality at 25(OH)D ≥100 nmol/L. The increased CVD HR in the lowest 25(OH)D quintile was more from IHD (1.35, 95% CI 1.13–1.60) and heart failure (1.38, 95% CI 1.08–1.77), than from cerebrovascular disease (1.13, 95% CI 0.97–1.31). Conclusion: Low 25(OH)D are associated with highest risk of CVD and mortality, and are consistent with accumulating evidence that increased risk of these diseases occurs primarily in people with vitamin D deficiency.

AB - Background: There is increasing evidence that vitamin D supplementation may only be beneficial in people with vitamin D deficiency, and the lack of sufficient people with very low vitamin D levels could explain the lack of protection against cardiovascular disease (CVD) reported in recent clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation. The aim of this study was to assess associations of low to moderate circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D with risk of incident CVD and all-cause mortality, as well as the risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), cerebrovascular disease, and heart failure separately. Methods and Results: Longitudinal analysis of electronic health records in The Health Improvement Network (THIN), a UK primary care database. The analysis included 180,263 patients age 18 years and older without a history of CVD and with circulating concentrations of 25(OH)D. After a mean follow-up of 2.2 (SD 1.7) years, there were 3747 patients diagnosed with CVD and 3912 patients died. Compared to patients in the highest quintile of 25(OHD) (≥ 67.5 nmol/L), those in the lowest 25(OH)D quintile (<23.1 nmol/L) had a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.24 (95% CI 1.12–1.38, P < 0.001) for CVD and 1.71 (1.55–1.88, P < 0.001) for mortality. The HR for both outcomes associated with 25(OH)D concentration was non-linear, being significantly increased in patients with 25(OH)D <35 nmol/L, and highest in those with 25(OH)D <25 nmol/L, although increased for mortality at 25(OH)D ≥100 nmol/L. The increased CVD HR in the lowest 25(OH)D quintile was more from IHD (1.35, 95% CI 1.13–1.60) and heart failure (1.38, 95% CI 1.08–1.77), than from cerebrovascular disease (1.13, 95% CI 0.97–1.31). Conclusion: Low 25(OH)D are associated with highest risk of CVD and mortality, and are consistent with accumulating evidence that increased risk of these diseases occurs primarily in people with vitamin D deficiency.

KW - 25-hydroxyvitamin D

KW - cardiovascular disease

KW - electronic health records

KW - mortality

KW - vitamin D

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85072525939&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jsbmb.2019.105480

DO - 10.1016/j.jsbmb.2019.105480

M3 - Article

VL - 195

JO - The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

JF - The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

SN - 0960-0760

M1 - 105480

ER -