Neurobiological evidence of longer-term physical activity interventions on mental health outcomes and cognition in young people: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

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@article{fbbbb23eeb2f4edca6e892ee2a113cdd,
title = "Neurobiological evidence of longer-term physical activity interventions on mental health outcomes and cognition in young people: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials",
abstract = "Objective: To investigate putative neurobiological mechanisms that link longer-term physical activity interventions to mental health and cognitive outcomes using randomised controlled trials in children, adolescents and young adults. Data sources: A range of medical and psychological science electronic databases were searched (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, PsychINFO). Review methods: Original research studies were selected, data were extracted and quality was appraised. Results: Sixteen primary papers were included, ranging from healthy and community samples to subclinical and clinical populations across a variety of age ranges and using different neurobiological measures (e.g. magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, cortisol, brain-derived neurotropic factor). Discussion: The majority of studies report improvement in mental health and cognition outcomes following longer-term physical activity interventions which coincide with neurobiological alterations, especially neuroimaging alterations in activation and electrophysiological parameters in frontal areas. Future research should include measures of pre-existing fitness and target those who would benefit the most from this type of intervention (e.g. those with a lower level of fitness and at risk for or with mental health problems).",
keywords = "BDNF, Cortisol, DTI, EEG, Exercise, fMRI, MRI",
author = "Kareen Heinze and Jennifer Cumming and Amrita Dosanjh and Sophia Palin and Shannen Poulton and Bagshaw, {Andrew P.} and Broome, {Matthew R.}",
note = "Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2020",
year = "2021",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1016/j.neubiorev.2020.10.014",
language = "English",
volume = "120",
pages = "431--441",
journal = "Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews",
issn = "0149-7634",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neurobiological evidence of longer-term physical activity interventions on mental health outcomes and cognition in young people

T2 - a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

AU - Heinze, Kareen

AU - Cumming, Jennifer

AU - Dosanjh, Amrita

AU - Palin, Sophia

AU - Poulton, Shannen

AU - Bagshaw, Andrew P.

AU - Broome, Matthew R.

N1 - Publisher Copyright: © 2020

PY - 2021/1

Y1 - 2021/1

N2 - Objective: To investigate putative neurobiological mechanisms that link longer-term physical activity interventions to mental health and cognitive outcomes using randomised controlled trials in children, adolescents and young adults. Data sources: A range of medical and psychological science electronic databases were searched (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, PsychINFO). Review methods: Original research studies were selected, data were extracted and quality was appraised. Results: Sixteen primary papers were included, ranging from healthy and community samples to subclinical and clinical populations across a variety of age ranges and using different neurobiological measures (e.g. magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, cortisol, brain-derived neurotropic factor). Discussion: The majority of studies report improvement in mental health and cognition outcomes following longer-term physical activity interventions which coincide with neurobiological alterations, especially neuroimaging alterations in activation and electrophysiological parameters in frontal areas. Future research should include measures of pre-existing fitness and target those who would benefit the most from this type of intervention (e.g. those with a lower level of fitness and at risk for or with mental health problems).

AB - Objective: To investigate putative neurobiological mechanisms that link longer-term physical activity interventions to mental health and cognitive outcomes using randomised controlled trials in children, adolescents and young adults. Data sources: A range of medical and psychological science electronic databases were searched (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, PsychINFO). Review methods: Original research studies were selected, data were extracted and quality was appraised. Results: Sixteen primary papers were included, ranging from healthy and community samples to subclinical and clinical populations across a variety of age ranges and using different neurobiological measures (e.g. magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, cortisol, brain-derived neurotropic factor). Discussion: The majority of studies report improvement in mental health and cognition outcomes following longer-term physical activity interventions which coincide with neurobiological alterations, especially neuroimaging alterations in activation and electrophysiological parameters in frontal areas. Future research should include measures of pre-existing fitness and target those who would benefit the most from this type of intervention (e.g. those with a lower level of fitness and at risk for or with mental health problems).

KW - BDNF

KW - Cortisol

KW - DTI

KW - EEG

KW - Exercise

KW - fMRI

KW - MRI

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85096396384&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2020.10.014

DO - 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2020.10.014

M3 - Review article

C2 - 33172601

AN - SCOPUS:85096396384

VL - 120

SP - 431

EP - 441

JO - Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews

JF - Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews

SN - 0149-7634

ER -