Neural responses to fearful eyes in children with conduct problems and varying levels of callous-unemotional traits

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Neural responses to fearful eyes in children with conduct problems and varying levels of callous-unemotional traits. / Sebastian, C.L.; McCrory, E.J.; Dadds, M.R.; Cecil, C.A.M.; Lockwood, P.L.; Hyde, Z.H.; De Brito, S.A.; Viding, E.

In: Psychological Medicine, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 99-109.

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Sebastian, C. L., McCrory, E. J., Dadds, M. R., Cecil, C. A. M., Lockwood, P. L., Hyde, Z. H., De Brito, S. A., & Viding, E. (2014). Neural responses to fearful eyes in children with conduct problems and varying levels of callous-unemotional traits. Psychological Medicine, 44(1), 99-109. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291713000482

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Sebastian, C.L. ; McCrory, E.J. ; Dadds, M.R. ; Cecil, C.A.M. ; Lockwood, P.L. ; Hyde, Z.H. ; De Brito, S.A. ; Viding, E. / Neural responses to fearful eyes in children with conduct problems and varying levels of callous-unemotional traits. In: Psychological Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 44, No. 1. pp. 99-109.

Bibtex

@article{34866006ce7048a38f5199cbbd275392,
title = "Neural responses to fearful eyes in children with conduct problems and varying levels of callous-unemotional traits",
abstract = "Background Children with conduct problems (CP) are a heterogeneous group. Those with high levels of callous-unemotional traits (CP/HCU) appear emotionally under-reactive at behavioural and neural levels whereas those with low levels of CU traits (CP/LCU) appear emotionally over-reactive, compared with typically developing (TD) controls. Investigating the degree to which these patterns of emotional reactivity are malleable may have important translational implications. Instructing participants with CP/HCU to focus on the eyes of fearful faces (i.e. the most salient feature) can ameliorate their fear-recognition deficits, but it is unknown whether this is mediated by amygdala response. It is also unknown whether focusing on fearful eyes is associated with increased amygdala reactivity in CP/LCU. Method Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure neural responses to fearful and calm faces in children with CP/HCU, CP/LCU and TD controls (n{\^A} ={\^A} 17 per group). On half of trials participants looked for a blue dot anywhere within target faces; on the other half, participants were directed to focus on the eye region. Results Reaction time (RT) data showed that CP/LCU were selectively slowed in the fear/eyes condition. For the same condition, CP/LCU also showed increased amygdala and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC)/orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) responses compared with TD controls. RT and amygdala response to fear/eyes were correlated in CP/LCU only. No effects of focusing on the eye region were observed in CP/HCU. Conclusions These data extend the evidence base suggesting that CU traits index meaningful heterogeneity in conduct problems. Focusing on regulating reactive emotional responses may be a fruitful strategy for children with CP/LCU.",
author = "C.L. Sebastian and E.J. McCrory and M.R. Dadds and C.A.M. Cecil and P.L. Lockwood and Z.H. Hyde and {De Brito}, S.A. and E. Viding",
year = "2014",
month = jan
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S0033291713000482",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "99--109",
journal = "Psychological Medicine",
issn = "0033-2917",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neural responses to fearful eyes in children with conduct problems and varying levels of callous-unemotional traits

AU - Sebastian, C.L.

AU - McCrory, E.J.

AU - Dadds, M.R.

AU - Cecil, C.A.M.

AU - Lockwood, P.L.

AU - Hyde, Z.H.

AU - De Brito, S.A.

AU - Viding, E.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Background Children with conduct problems (CP) are a heterogeneous group. Those with high levels of callous-unemotional traits (CP/HCU) appear emotionally under-reactive at behavioural and neural levels whereas those with low levels of CU traits (CP/LCU) appear emotionally over-reactive, compared with typically developing (TD) controls. Investigating the degree to which these patterns of emotional reactivity are malleable may have important translational implications. Instructing participants with CP/HCU to focus on the eyes of fearful faces (i.e. the most salient feature) can ameliorate their fear-recognition deficits, but it is unknown whether this is mediated by amygdala response. It is also unknown whether focusing on fearful eyes is associated with increased amygdala reactivity in CP/LCU. Method Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure neural responses to fearful and calm faces in children with CP/HCU, CP/LCU and TD controls (n = 17 per group). On half of trials participants looked for a blue dot anywhere within target faces; on the other half, participants were directed to focus on the eye region. Results Reaction time (RT) data showed that CP/LCU were selectively slowed in the fear/eyes condition. For the same condition, CP/LCU also showed increased amygdala and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC)/orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) responses compared with TD controls. RT and amygdala response to fear/eyes were correlated in CP/LCU only. No effects of focusing on the eye region were observed in CP/HCU. Conclusions These data extend the evidence base suggesting that CU traits index meaningful heterogeneity in conduct problems. Focusing on regulating reactive emotional responses may be a fruitful strategy for children with CP/LCU.

AB - Background Children with conduct problems (CP) are a heterogeneous group. Those with high levels of callous-unemotional traits (CP/HCU) appear emotionally under-reactive at behavioural and neural levels whereas those with low levels of CU traits (CP/LCU) appear emotionally over-reactive, compared with typically developing (TD) controls. Investigating the degree to which these patterns of emotional reactivity are malleable may have important translational implications. Instructing participants with CP/HCU to focus on the eyes of fearful faces (i.e. the most salient feature) can ameliorate their fear-recognition deficits, but it is unknown whether this is mediated by amygdala response. It is also unknown whether focusing on fearful eyes is associated with increased amygdala reactivity in CP/LCU. Method Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure neural responses to fearful and calm faces in children with CP/HCU, CP/LCU and TD controls (n = 17 per group). On half of trials participants looked for a blue dot anywhere within target faces; on the other half, participants were directed to focus on the eye region. Results Reaction time (RT) data showed that CP/LCU were selectively slowed in the fear/eyes condition. For the same condition, CP/LCU also showed increased amygdala and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC)/orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) responses compared with TD controls. RT and amygdala response to fear/eyes were correlated in CP/LCU only. No effects of focusing on the eye region were observed in CP/HCU. Conclusions These data extend the evidence base suggesting that CU traits index meaningful heterogeneity in conduct problems. Focusing on regulating reactive emotional responses may be a fruitful strategy for children with CP/LCU.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84889828170&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0033291713000482

DO - 10.1017/S0033291713000482

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84889828170

VL - 44

SP - 99

EP - 109

JO - Psychological Medicine

JF - Psychological Medicine

SN - 0033-2917

IS - 1

ER -