Neural processing associated with cognitive and affective theory of mind in adolescents and adults

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Neural processing associated with cognitive and affective theory of mind in adolescents and adults. / Sebastian, C.L.; De brito, S.A.; Mccrory, E.J.P.; Viding, E.; Bird, G.; Blakemore, S.; Fontaine, N.M.G.

In: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, Vol. 7, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 53-63.

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Sebastian, C.L. ; De brito, S.A. ; Mccrory, E.J.P. ; Viding, E. ; Bird, G. ; Blakemore, S. ; Fontaine, N.M.G. / Neural processing associated with cognitive and affective theory of mind in adolescents and adults. In: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 1. pp. 53-63.

Bibtex

@article{72a6db653f644f98b514b7b5b1cc0edc,
title = "Neural processing associated with cognitive and affective theory of mind in adolescents and adults",
abstract = "Theory of Mind (ToM) is the ability to attribute thoughts, intentions and beliefs to others. This involves component processes, including cognitive perspective taking (cognitive ToM) and understanding emotions (affective ToM). This study assessed the distinction and overlap of neural processes involved in these respective components, and also investigated their development between adolescence and adulthood. While data suggest that ToM develops between adolescence and adulthood, these populations have not been compared on cognitive and affective ToM domains. Using fMRI with 15 adolescent (aged 11-16 years) and 15 adult (aged 24-40 years) males, we assessed neural responses during cartoon vignettes requiring cognitive ToM, affective ToM or physical causality comprehension (control). An additional aim was to explore relationships between fMRI data and self-reported empathy. Both cognitive and affective ToM conditions were associated with neural responses in the classic ToM network across both groups, although only affective ToM recruited medial/ventromedial PFC (mPFC/vmPFC). Adolescents additionally activated vmPFC more than did adults during affective ToM. The specificity of the mPFC/vmPFC response during affective ToM supports evidence from lesion studies suggesting that vmPFC may integrate affective information during ToM. Furthermore, the differential neural response in vmPFC between adult and adolescent groups indicates developmental changes in affective ToM processing.",
author = "C.L. Sebastian and {De brito}, S.A. and E.J.P. Mccrory and E. Viding and G. Bird and S. Blakemore and N.M.G. Fontaine",
note = "Copyright 2012 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2012",
month = jan,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/scan/nsr023",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "53--63",
journal = "Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience",
issn = "1749-5016",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neural processing associated with cognitive and affective theory of mind in adolescents and adults

AU - Sebastian, C.L.

AU - De brito, S.A.

AU - Mccrory, E.J.P.

AU - Viding, E.

AU - Bird, G.

AU - Blakemore, S.

AU - Fontaine, N.M.G.

N1 - Copyright 2012 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2012/1/1

Y1 - 2012/1/1

N2 - Theory of Mind (ToM) is the ability to attribute thoughts, intentions and beliefs to others. This involves component processes, including cognitive perspective taking (cognitive ToM) and understanding emotions (affective ToM). This study assessed the distinction and overlap of neural processes involved in these respective components, and also investigated their development between adolescence and adulthood. While data suggest that ToM develops between adolescence and adulthood, these populations have not been compared on cognitive and affective ToM domains. Using fMRI with 15 adolescent (aged 11-16 years) and 15 adult (aged 24-40 years) males, we assessed neural responses during cartoon vignettes requiring cognitive ToM, affective ToM or physical causality comprehension (control). An additional aim was to explore relationships between fMRI data and self-reported empathy. Both cognitive and affective ToM conditions were associated with neural responses in the classic ToM network across both groups, although only affective ToM recruited medial/ventromedial PFC (mPFC/vmPFC). Adolescents additionally activated vmPFC more than did adults during affective ToM. The specificity of the mPFC/vmPFC response during affective ToM supports evidence from lesion studies suggesting that vmPFC may integrate affective information during ToM. Furthermore, the differential neural response in vmPFC between adult and adolescent groups indicates developmental changes in affective ToM processing.

AB - Theory of Mind (ToM) is the ability to attribute thoughts, intentions and beliefs to others. This involves component processes, including cognitive perspective taking (cognitive ToM) and understanding emotions (affective ToM). This study assessed the distinction and overlap of neural processes involved in these respective components, and also investigated their development between adolescence and adulthood. While data suggest that ToM develops between adolescence and adulthood, these populations have not been compared on cognitive and affective ToM domains. Using fMRI with 15 adolescent (aged 11-16 years) and 15 adult (aged 24-40 years) males, we assessed neural responses during cartoon vignettes requiring cognitive ToM, affective ToM or physical causality comprehension (control). An additional aim was to explore relationships between fMRI data and self-reported empathy. Both cognitive and affective ToM conditions were associated with neural responses in the classic ToM network across both groups, although only affective ToM recruited medial/ventromedial PFC (mPFC/vmPFC). Adolescents additionally activated vmPFC more than did adults during affective ToM. The specificity of the mPFC/vmPFC response during affective ToM supports evidence from lesion studies suggesting that vmPFC may integrate affective information during ToM. Furthermore, the differential neural response in vmPFC between adult and adolescent groups indicates developmental changes in affective ToM processing.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?partnerID=yv4JPVwI&eid=2-s2.0-84855685277&md5=168d8938f36abb29990e320d9336e9c8

U2 - 10.1093/scan/nsr023

DO - 10.1093/scan/nsr023

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84855685277

VL - 7

SP - 53

EP - 63

JO - Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

JF - Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

SN - 1749-5016

IS - 1

ER -