Native mass spectrometry: what is in the name?

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Authors

Colleges, School and Institutes

External organisations

  • Utrecht University
  • Netherlands Proteomics Center

Abstract

Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is nowadays one of the cornerstones of biomolecular mass spectrometry and proteomics. Advances in sample preparation and mass analyzers have enabled researchers to extract much more information from biological samples than just the molecular weight. In particular, relevant for structural biology, noncovalent protein–protein and protein–ligand complexes can now also be analyzed by MS. For these types of analyses, assemblies need to be retained in their native quaternary state in the gas phase. This initial small niche of biomolecular mass spectrometry, nowadays often referred to as “native MS,” has come to maturation over the last two decades, with dozens of laboratories using it to study mostly protein assemblies, but also DNA and RNA-protein assemblies, with the goal to define structure–function relationships. In this perspective, we describe the origins of and (re)define the term native MS, portraying in detail what we meant by “native MS,” when the term was coined and also describing what it does (according to us) not entail. Additionally, we describe a few examples highlighting what native MS is, showing its successes to date while illustrating the wide scope this technology has in solving complex biological questions. [Figure not available: see fulltext.]

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-13
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry
Volume28
Issue number1
Early online date1 Dec 2016
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

Keywords

  • Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), Native mass spectrometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas