Multiple goal orientations as predictors of moral behavior in youth soccer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Authors

Colleges, School and Institutes

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine task-, ego-, and social-goal orientations as predictors of prosocial and antisocial behavior in youth soccer. Participants were 365 male (n = 227) and female (n = 138) youth soccer players (M-age = 13.4 years, SD = 1.8), who completed questionnaires measuring task and ego orientation; the goals of social affiliation, social recognition and social status; prosocial and antisocial behavior; and demographics. Regression analyses revealed that prosocial behavior was predicted positively by task orientation and social affiliation and negatively by social status. In contrast, antisocial behavior was predicted positively by ego orientation and social status and negatively by task orientation. Findings for task and ego orientation are consistent with previous work. Social-goal orientations explained further variance in prosocial and antisocial behavior, and their inclusion in future moral research is encouraged.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)417-437
Number of pages21
JournalThe Sport Psychologist
Volume21
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2007