Monitoring fragile upland landscapes: The application of airborne lidar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Monitoring fragile upland landscapes: The application of airborne lidar. / Kincey, Mark; Challis, Keith.

In: Journal for Nature Conservation, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.05.2010, p. 126-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{02dd0e37ae48411ba68665967fec3958,
title = "Monitoring fragile upland landscapes: The application of airborne lidar",
abstract = "This paper investigates the potential of airborne lidar for recording and monitoring erosion levels in environmentally fragile upland landscapes, using an area of the Brecon Beacons National Park as a case study. Upland areas contain a rich variety of natural and cultural resources that are increasingly endangered through factors such as insensitive land-use practices, improvements in recreational access and climate change. Airborne lidar provides a highly detailed record of microtopography, in this example at a resolution of 0.5 m with a vertical accuracy of c.0.15 m and the ability to differentiate elevation changes to within 1-2 cm. The technique therefore allows the rapid and cost-effective recording of the nature and extent of erosion at a landscape scale, with the results of this analysis recording over 46 kilometres of path erosion within a 3.8 km(2) area. The technique also provides the ability to highlight particular areas of risk, such as extensive braided erosion around path intersections and damage to protected SSSI habitats, providing a snapshot record of erosion at a particular point in time and an invaluable source of information for conservationists and policy-makers. (C) 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Sustainable land-use, Erosion, Conservation management, Remote sensing, GIS",
author = "Mark Kincey and Keith Challis",
year = "2010",
month = may,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jnc.2009.06.003",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "126--134",
journal = "Journal for Nature Conservation",
issn = "1617-1381",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Monitoring fragile upland landscapes: The application of airborne lidar

AU - Kincey, Mark

AU - Challis, Keith

PY - 2010/5/1

Y1 - 2010/5/1

N2 - This paper investigates the potential of airborne lidar for recording and monitoring erosion levels in environmentally fragile upland landscapes, using an area of the Brecon Beacons National Park as a case study. Upland areas contain a rich variety of natural and cultural resources that are increasingly endangered through factors such as insensitive land-use practices, improvements in recreational access and climate change. Airborne lidar provides a highly detailed record of microtopography, in this example at a resolution of 0.5 m with a vertical accuracy of c.0.15 m and the ability to differentiate elevation changes to within 1-2 cm. The technique therefore allows the rapid and cost-effective recording of the nature and extent of erosion at a landscape scale, with the results of this analysis recording over 46 kilometres of path erosion within a 3.8 km(2) area. The technique also provides the ability to highlight particular areas of risk, such as extensive braided erosion around path intersections and damage to protected SSSI habitats, providing a snapshot record of erosion at a particular point in time and an invaluable source of information for conservationists and policy-makers. (C) 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

AB - This paper investigates the potential of airborne lidar for recording and monitoring erosion levels in environmentally fragile upland landscapes, using an area of the Brecon Beacons National Park as a case study. Upland areas contain a rich variety of natural and cultural resources that are increasingly endangered through factors such as insensitive land-use practices, improvements in recreational access and climate change. Airborne lidar provides a highly detailed record of microtopography, in this example at a resolution of 0.5 m with a vertical accuracy of c.0.15 m and the ability to differentiate elevation changes to within 1-2 cm. The technique therefore allows the rapid and cost-effective recording of the nature and extent of erosion at a landscape scale, with the results of this analysis recording over 46 kilometres of path erosion within a 3.8 km(2) area. The technique also provides the ability to highlight particular areas of risk, such as extensive braided erosion around path intersections and damage to protected SSSI habitats, providing a snapshot record of erosion at a particular point in time and an invaluable source of information for conservationists and policy-makers. (C) 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

KW - Sustainable land-use

KW - Erosion

KW - Conservation management

KW - Remote sensing

KW - GIS

U2 - 10.1016/j.jnc.2009.06.003

DO - 10.1016/j.jnc.2009.06.003

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 126

EP - 134

JO - Journal for Nature Conservation

JF - Journal for Nature Conservation

SN - 1617-1381

IS - 2

ER -