Mapping ‘Wordsworthshire’: a GIS study of literary tourism in Victorian Lakeland

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Mapping ‘Wordsworthshire’ : a GIS study of literary tourism in Victorian Lakeland. / Donaldson, Christopher; Gregory, Ian; Murrieta-Flores, Patricia .

In: Journal of Victorian Culture, Vol. 20, No. 3, 03.07.2015, p. 287-307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Donaldson, Christopher ; Gregory, Ian ; Murrieta-Flores, Patricia . / Mapping ‘Wordsworthshire’ : a GIS study of literary tourism in Victorian Lakeland. In: Journal of Victorian Culture. 2015 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 287-307.

Bibtex

@article{385e15ba03e043eda627fca6570e45c9,
title = "Mapping {\textquoteleft}Wordsworthshire{\textquoteright}: a GIS study of literary tourism in Victorian Lakeland",
abstract = "This article answers the call for scholarship that models the implementation of geographic information systems (GIS) technologies in literary-historical research. Combining methods and perspectives from cultural history, literary studies, and geographic information sciences, the article confirms, challenges, and extends understanding of Victorian literary tourism in the English Lake District. It engages with the accounts of several nineteenth-century tourists, paying specific attention to Nathaniel Hawthorne's English Notebooks and Hardwicke Drummond Rawnsley's A Coach Drive at the Lakes, which are examined alongside contemporaneous guidebooks and other commercial tourist publications. In the process, the article draws attention to a spatial correlation between the route of the Ambleside turnpike (the Lake District's principal coach road) and the major literary sites to which Victorian Lakeland visitors were guided. Recognizing this correlation, we contend, helps to deepen our appreciation of how the physical and imaginative geographies of the Lake District region interrelate. Specifically, it helps us appreciate how the Victorian fascination with the Lakeland's literary associations was modulated not only by interest in the region's other attractions, but also by material conditions on the ground.",
keywords = "Literary tourism, William Wordsworth, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Lake District, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Digital Humanities, Mobility Studies",
author = "Christopher Donaldson and Ian Gregory and Patricia Murrieta-Flores",
year = "2015",
month = jul,
day = "3",
doi = "10.1080/13555502.2015.1058089",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "287--307",
journal = "Journal of Victorian Culture",
issn = "1355-5502",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mapping ‘Wordsworthshire’

T2 - a GIS study of literary tourism in Victorian Lakeland

AU - Donaldson, Christopher

AU - Gregory, Ian

AU - Murrieta-Flores, Patricia

PY - 2015/7/3

Y1 - 2015/7/3

N2 - This article answers the call for scholarship that models the implementation of geographic information systems (GIS) technologies in literary-historical research. Combining methods and perspectives from cultural history, literary studies, and geographic information sciences, the article confirms, challenges, and extends understanding of Victorian literary tourism in the English Lake District. It engages with the accounts of several nineteenth-century tourists, paying specific attention to Nathaniel Hawthorne's English Notebooks and Hardwicke Drummond Rawnsley's A Coach Drive at the Lakes, which are examined alongside contemporaneous guidebooks and other commercial tourist publications. In the process, the article draws attention to a spatial correlation between the route of the Ambleside turnpike (the Lake District's principal coach road) and the major literary sites to which Victorian Lakeland visitors were guided. Recognizing this correlation, we contend, helps to deepen our appreciation of how the physical and imaginative geographies of the Lake District region interrelate. Specifically, it helps us appreciate how the Victorian fascination with the Lakeland's literary associations was modulated not only by interest in the region's other attractions, but also by material conditions on the ground.

AB - This article answers the call for scholarship that models the implementation of geographic information systems (GIS) technologies in literary-historical research. Combining methods and perspectives from cultural history, literary studies, and geographic information sciences, the article confirms, challenges, and extends understanding of Victorian literary tourism in the English Lake District. It engages with the accounts of several nineteenth-century tourists, paying specific attention to Nathaniel Hawthorne's English Notebooks and Hardwicke Drummond Rawnsley's A Coach Drive at the Lakes, which are examined alongside contemporaneous guidebooks and other commercial tourist publications. In the process, the article draws attention to a spatial correlation between the route of the Ambleside turnpike (the Lake District's principal coach road) and the major literary sites to which Victorian Lakeland visitors were guided. Recognizing this correlation, we contend, helps to deepen our appreciation of how the physical and imaginative geographies of the Lake District region interrelate. Specifically, it helps us appreciate how the Victorian fascination with the Lakeland's literary associations was modulated not only by interest in the region's other attractions, but also by material conditions on the ground.

KW - Literary tourism

KW - William Wordsworth

KW - Nathaniel Hawthorne

KW - Lake District

KW - Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

KW - Digital Humanities

KW - Mobility Studies

U2 - 10.1080/13555502.2015.1058089

DO - 10.1080/13555502.2015.1058089

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 287

EP - 307

JO - Journal of Victorian Culture

JF - Journal of Victorian Culture

SN - 1355-5502

IS - 3

ER -