Making tools isn’t child’s play

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Making tools isn’t child’s play. / Beck, Sarah; Apperly, Ian; Chappell, Jackie; Guthrie, C; Cutting, Nicola.

In: Cognition, Vol. 119, No. 2, 01.05.2011, p. 301-306.

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@article{9a4eee55ebed43daa3f83a6c680c4ef2,
title = "Making tools isn{\textquoteright}t child{\textquoteright}s play",
abstract = "Tool making evidences intelligent, flexible thinking. In Experiment 1, we confirmed that 4- to 7-year-olds chose a hook tool to retrieve a bucket from a tube. In Experiment 2, 3- to 5-year-olds consistently failed to innovate a simple hook tool. Eight-year-olds performed at mature levels. In contrast, making a tool following demonstration was easy for even the youngest children. In Experiment 3, children's performance did not improve given the opportunity to manipulate the objects in a warm-up phase. Children's tool innovation lags substantially behind their ability to learn how to make tools by observing others.",
author = "Sarah Beck and Ian Apperly and Jackie Chappell and C Guthrie and Nicola Cutting",
year = "2011",
month = may,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.cognition.2011.01.003",
language = "English",
volume = "119",
pages = "301--306",
journal = "Cognition",
issn = "0010-0277",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Making tools isn’t child’s play

AU - Beck, Sarah

AU - Apperly, Ian

AU - Chappell, Jackie

AU - Guthrie, C

AU - Cutting, Nicola

PY - 2011/5/1

Y1 - 2011/5/1

N2 - Tool making evidences intelligent, flexible thinking. In Experiment 1, we confirmed that 4- to 7-year-olds chose a hook tool to retrieve a bucket from a tube. In Experiment 2, 3- to 5-year-olds consistently failed to innovate a simple hook tool. Eight-year-olds performed at mature levels. In contrast, making a tool following demonstration was easy for even the youngest children. In Experiment 3, children's performance did not improve given the opportunity to manipulate the objects in a warm-up phase. Children's tool innovation lags substantially behind their ability to learn how to make tools by observing others.

AB - Tool making evidences intelligent, flexible thinking. In Experiment 1, we confirmed that 4- to 7-year-olds chose a hook tool to retrieve a bucket from a tube. In Experiment 2, 3- to 5-year-olds consistently failed to innovate a simple hook tool. Eight-year-olds performed at mature levels. In contrast, making a tool following demonstration was easy for even the youngest children. In Experiment 3, children's performance did not improve given the opportunity to manipulate the objects in a warm-up phase. Children's tool innovation lags substantially behind their ability to learn how to make tools by observing others.

U2 - 10.1016/j.cognition.2011.01.003

DO - 10.1016/j.cognition.2011.01.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 21315325

VL - 119

SP - 301

EP - 306

JO - Cognition

JF - Cognition

SN - 0010-0277

IS - 2

ER -