Love and knowledge: Emotion in feminist epistemology

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Love and knowledge : Emotion in feminist epistemology. / Jaggar, Alison M.

In: Inquiry, Vol. 32, No. 2, 1989, p. 151-176.

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Jaggar, Alison M. / Love and knowledge : Emotion in feminist epistemology. In: Inquiry. 1989 ; Vol. 32, No. 2. pp. 151-176.

Bibtex

@article{4ef112d3af9f46fa97b35fd79839ffd7,
title = "Love and knowledge: Emotion in feminist epistemology",
abstract = "This paper argues that, by construing emotion as epistemologically subversive, the Western tradition has tended to obscure the vital role of emotion in the construction of knowledge. The paper begins with an account of emotion that stresses its active, voluntary, and socially constructed aspects, and indicates how emotion is involved in evaluation and observation. It then moves on to show how the myth of dispassionate investigation has functioned historically to undermine the epistemic authority of women as well as other social groups associated culturally with emotion. Finally, the paper sketches some ways in which the emotions of underclass groups, especially women, may contribute to the development of a critical social theory.",
author = "Jaggar, {Alison M.}",
year = "1989",
doi = "10.1080/00201748908602185",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "151--176",
journal = "Inquiry",
issn = "0020-174X",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Love and knowledge

T2 - Emotion in feminist epistemology

AU - Jaggar, Alison M.

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - This paper argues that, by construing emotion as epistemologically subversive, the Western tradition has tended to obscure the vital role of emotion in the construction of knowledge. The paper begins with an account of emotion that stresses its active, voluntary, and socially constructed aspects, and indicates how emotion is involved in evaluation and observation. It then moves on to show how the myth of dispassionate investigation has functioned historically to undermine the epistemic authority of women as well as other social groups associated culturally with emotion. Finally, the paper sketches some ways in which the emotions of underclass groups, especially women, may contribute to the development of a critical social theory.

AB - This paper argues that, by construing emotion as epistemologically subversive, the Western tradition has tended to obscure the vital role of emotion in the construction of knowledge. The paper begins with an account of emotion that stresses its active, voluntary, and socially constructed aspects, and indicates how emotion is involved in evaluation and observation. It then moves on to show how the myth of dispassionate investigation has functioned historically to undermine the epistemic authority of women as well as other social groups associated culturally with emotion. Finally, the paper sketches some ways in which the emotions of underclass groups, especially women, may contribute to the development of a critical social theory.

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U2 - 10.1080/00201748908602185

DO - 10.1080/00201748908602185

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84947641314

VL - 32

SP - 151

EP - 176

JO - Inquiry

JF - Inquiry

SN - 0020-174X

IS - 2

ER -