Lexical variation and change in British Sign Language

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Lexical variation and change in British Sign Language. / Stamp, Rose; Schembri, Adam; Fenlon, Jordan; Rentelis, Ramas; Woll, Bencie; Cormier, Kearsy.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 9, No. 4, e94053, 23.04.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Stamp, R, Schembri, A, Fenlon, J, Rentelis, R, Woll, B & Cormier, K 2014, 'Lexical variation and change in British Sign Language', PLoS ONE, vol. 9, no. 4, e94053. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0094053

APA

Stamp, R., Schembri, A., Fenlon, J., Rentelis, R., Woll, B., & Cormier, K. (2014). Lexical variation and change in British Sign Language. PLoS ONE, 9(4), [e94053]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0094053

Vancouver

Stamp R, Schembri A, Fenlon J, Rentelis R, Woll B, Cormier K. Lexical variation and change in British Sign Language. PLoS ONE. 2014 Apr 23;9(4). e94053. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0094053

Author

Stamp, Rose ; Schembri, Adam ; Fenlon, Jordan ; Rentelis, Ramas ; Woll, Bencie ; Cormier, Kearsy. / Lexical variation and change in British Sign Language. In: PLoS ONE. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 4.

Bibtex

@article{d5d5f84586884db385491c14e4a4a022,
title = "Lexical variation and change in British Sign Language",
abstract = "This paper presents results from a corpus-based study investigating lexical variation in BSL. An earlier study investigating variation in BSL numeral signs found that younger signers were using a decreasing variety of regionally distinct variants, suggesting that levelling may be taking place. Here, we report findings from a larger investigation looking at regional lexical variants for colours, countries, numbers and UK placenames elicited as part of the BSL Corpus Project. Age, school location and language background were significant predictors of lexical variation, with younger signers using a more levelled variety. This change appears to be happening faster in particular sub-groups of the deaf community (e.g., signers from hearing families). Also, we find that for the names of some UK cities, signers from outside the region use a different sign than those who live in the region.",
author = "Rose Stamp and Adam Schembri and Jordan Fenlon and Ramas Rentelis and Bencie Woll and Kearsy Cormier",
year = "2014",
month = apr,
day = "23",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0094053",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
journal = "PLoSONE",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science (PLOS)",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lexical variation and change in British Sign Language

AU - Stamp, Rose

AU - Schembri, Adam

AU - Fenlon, Jordan

AU - Rentelis, Ramas

AU - Woll, Bencie

AU - Cormier, Kearsy

PY - 2014/4/23

Y1 - 2014/4/23

N2 - This paper presents results from a corpus-based study investigating lexical variation in BSL. An earlier study investigating variation in BSL numeral signs found that younger signers were using a decreasing variety of regionally distinct variants, suggesting that levelling may be taking place. Here, we report findings from a larger investigation looking at regional lexical variants for colours, countries, numbers and UK placenames elicited as part of the BSL Corpus Project. Age, school location and language background were significant predictors of lexical variation, with younger signers using a more levelled variety. This change appears to be happening faster in particular sub-groups of the deaf community (e.g., signers from hearing families). Also, we find that for the names of some UK cities, signers from outside the region use a different sign than those who live in the region.

AB - This paper presents results from a corpus-based study investigating lexical variation in BSL. An earlier study investigating variation in BSL numeral signs found that younger signers were using a decreasing variety of regionally distinct variants, suggesting that levelling may be taking place. Here, we report findings from a larger investigation looking at regional lexical variants for colours, countries, numbers and UK placenames elicited as part of the BSL Corpus Project. Age, school location and language background were significant predictors of lexical variation, with younger signers using a more levelled variety. This change appears to be happening faster in particular sub-groups of the deaf community (e.g., signers from hearing families). Also, we find that for the names of some UK cities, signers from outside the region use a different sign than those who live in the region.

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U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0094053

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0094053

M3 - Article

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AN - SCOPUS:84899757959

VL - 9

JO - PLoSONE

JF - PLoSONE

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IS - 4

M1 - e94053

ER -