Learning To Breathe: Developmental Phase Transitions in Oxygen Status

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Authors

  • Michael J Considine
  • Pedro Diaz-Vivancos
  • Pavel Kerchev
  • Santiago Signorelli
  • Patricia Agudelo-Romero
  • Christine H Foyer

Colleges, School and Institutes

External organisations

  • The UWA Institute of Agriculture, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia; Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia, South Perth, WA 6151, Australia; Centre for Plant Sciences, School of Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK. Electronic address: michael.considine@uwa.edu.au.
  • Group of Fruit Biotechnology, Department of Plant Breeding, Centro de Edafología y Biología Aplicada del Segura (CEBAS)-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Campus Universitario de Espinardo, Murcia 30100, Spain.
  • Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie (VIB) Department of Plant Systems Biology, University of Gent Technologiepark 927, Gent, 9052 Belgium.
  • School of Plant Biology, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia.
  • Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia.
  • School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, United Kingdom.
  • The UWA Institute of Agriculture, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia; Centre for Plant Sciences, School of Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK.

Abstract

Plants are developmentally disposed to significant changes in oxygen availability, but our understanding of the importance of hypoxia is almost entirely limited to stress biology. Differential patterns of the abundance of oxygen, nitric oxide ((•)NO), and reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as of redox potential, occur in organs and meristems, and examples are emerging in the literature of mechanistic relationships of these to development. We describe here the convergence of these cues in meristematic and reproductive tissues, and discuss the evidence for regulated hypoxic niches within which oxygen-, ROS-, (•)NO-, and redox-dependent signalling curate developmental transitions in plants.

Details

Original languageEnglish
JournalTrends in Plant Science
Early online date13 Dec 2016
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 Dec 2016