Intravenous iron delivers a sustained (8-week) lowering of pulmonary artery pressure during exercise in healthy older humans

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Intravenous iron delivers a sustained (8-week) lowering of pulmonary artery pressure during exercise in healthy older humans. / Cheng, Hung-Yuan; Frise, Matthew C; Curtis, M Kate; Bart, Nicole K; Petousi, Nayia; Talbot, Nick P; Balanos, George M; Robbins, Peter A; Dorrington, Keith L.

In: Physiological reports, Vol. 7, No. 13, e14164, 01.08.2019, p. e14164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Cheng, H-Y, Frise, MC, Curtis, MK, Bart, NK, Petousi, N, Talbot, NP, Balanos, GM, Robbins, PA & Dorrington, KL 2019, 'Intravenous iron delivers a sustained (8-week) lowering of pulmonary artery pressure during exercise in healthy older humans', Physiological reports, vol. 7, no. 13, e14164, pp. e14164. https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.14164

APA

Cheng, H-Y., Frise, M. C., Curtis, M. K., Bart, N. K., Petousi, N., Talbot, N. P., Balanos, G. M., Robbins, P. A., & Dorrington, K. L. (2019). Intravenous iron delivers a sustained (8-week) lowering of pulmonary artery pressure during exercise in healthy older humans. Physiological reports, 7(13), e14164. [e14164]. https://doi.org/10.14814/phy2.14164

Vancouver

Author

Cheng, Hung-Yuan ; Frise, Matthew C ; Curtis, M Kate ; Bart, Nicole K ; Petousi, Nayia ; Talbot, Nick P ; Balanos, George M ; Robbins, Peter A ; Dorrington, Keith L. / Intravenous iron delivers a sustained (8-week) lowering of pulmonary artery pressure during exercise in healthy older humans. In: Physiological reports. 2019 ; Vol. 7, No. 13. pp. e14164.

Bibtex

@article{6cae107c5642402390d10828cb74234c,
title = "Intravenous iron delivers a sustained (8-week) lowering of pulmonary artery pressure during exercise in healthy older humans",
abstract = "In older individuals, pulmonary artery pressure rises markedly during exercise, probably due in part to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and in part to an increase in left-heart filling pressure. Older individuals also show more marked pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia at rest. Treatment with intravenous iron reduces the rise in pulmonary artery pressure observed during hypoxia. Here, we test the hypothesis that intravenous iron administration may also attenuate the rise in pulmonary artery pressure with exercise in older individuals. In a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled physiology study in 32 healthy participants aged 50-80 years, we explored the hypothesis that iron administration would deliver a fall in systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) during moderate cycling exercise (20 min duration; increase in heart rate of 30 min-1 ) and a change in maximal cycling exercise capacity ( V ˙ O 2 m a x ). Participants were studied before, and at 3 h to 8 weeks after, infusion. SPAP was measured using Doppler echocardiography. Iron administration resulted in marked changes in indices of iron homeostasis over 8 weeks, but no significant change in hemoglobin concentration or inflammatory markers. Resting SPAP was also unchanged, but SPAP during exercise was lower by ~3 mmHg in those receiving iron (P < 0.0001). This effect persisted for 8 weeks. Although V ˙ O 2 m a x remained unaffected in the iron-replete healthy participants studied here, this study demonstrates for the first time the ability of intravenous iron supplementation to reduce systolic pulmonary artery pressure during exercise.",
keywords = "Exercise, iron, pulmonary circulation, pulmonary hypertension",
author = "Hung-Yuan Cheng and Frise, {Matthew C} and Curtis, {M Kate} and Bart, {Nicole K} and Nayia Petousi and Talbot, {Nick P} and Balanos, {George M} and Robbins, {Peter A} and Dorrington, {Keith L}",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2019 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.",
year = "2019",
month = aug,
day = "1",
doi = "10.14814/phy2.14164",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "e14164",
journal = "Physiological reports",
issn = "2051-817X",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "13",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intravenous iron delivers a sustained (8-week) lowering of pulmonary artery pressure during exercise in healthy older humans

AU - Cheng, Hung-Yuan

AU - Frise, Matthew C

AU - Curtis, M Kate

AU - Bart, Nicole K

AU - Petousi, Nayia

AU - Talbot, Nick P

AU - Balanos, George M

AU - Robbins, Peter A

AU - Dorrington, Keith L

N1 - © 2019 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

PY - 2019/8/1

Y1 - 2019/8/1

N2 - In older individuals, pulmonary artery pressure rises markedly during exercise, probably due in part to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and in part to an increase in left-heart filling pressure. Older individuals also show more marked pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia at rest. Treatment with intravenous iron reduces the rise in pulmonary artery pressure observed during hypoxia. Here, we test the hypothesis that intravenous iron administration may also attenuate the rise in pulmonary artery pressure with exercise in older individuals. In a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled physiology study in 32 healthy participants aged 50-80 years, we explored the hypothesis that iron administration would deliver a fall in systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) during moderate cycling exercise (20 min duration; increase in heart rate of 30 min-1 ) and a change in maximal cycling exercise capacity ( V ˙ O 2 m a x ). Participants were studied before, and at 3 h to 8 weeks after, infusion. SPAP was measured using Doppler echocardiography. Iron administration resulted in marked changes in indices of iron homeostasis over 8 weeks, but no significant change in hemoglobin concentration or inflammatory markers. Resting SPAP was also unchanged, but SPAP during exercise was lower by ~3 mmHg in those receiving iron (P < 0.0001). This effect persisted for 8 weeks. Although V ˙ O 2 m a x remained unaffected in the iron-replete healthy participants studied here, this study demonstrates for the first time the ability of intravenous iron supplementation to reduce systolic pulmonary artery pressure during exercise.

AB - In older individuals, pulmonary artery pressure rises markedly during exercise, probably due in part to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and in part to an increase in left-heart filling pressure. Older individuals also show more marked pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia at rest. Treatment with intravenous iron reduces the rise in pulmonary artery pressure observed during hypoxia. Here, we test the hypothesis that intravenous iron administration may also attenuate the rise in pulmonary artery pressure with exercise in older individuals. In a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled physiology study in 32 healthy participants aged 50-80 years, we explored the hypothesis that iron administration would deliver a fall in systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) during moderate cycling exercise (20 min duration; increase in heart rate of 30 min-1 ) and a change in maximal cycling exercise capacity ( V ˙ O 2 m a x ). Participants were studied before, and at 3 h to 8 weeks after, infusion. SPAP was measured using Doppler echocardiography. Iron administration resulted in marked changes in indices of iron homeostasis over 8 weeks, but no significant change in hemoglobin concentration or inflammatory markers. Resting SPAP was also unchanged, but SPAP during exercise was lower by ~3 mmHg in those receiving iron (P < 0.0001). This effect persisted for 8 weeks. Although V ˙ O 2 m a x remained unaffected in the iron-replete healthy participants studied here, this study demonstrates for the first time the ability of intravenous iron supplementation to reduce systolic pulmonary artery pressure during exercise.

KW - Exercise

KW - iron

KW - pulmonary circulation

KW - pulmonary hypertension

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069056835&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.14814/phy2.14164

DO - 10.14814/phy2.14164

M3 - Article

C2 - 31270967

VL - 7

SP - e14164

JO - Physiological reports

JF - Physiological reports

SN - 2051-817X

IS - 13

M1 - e14164

ER -