Information presentation and decisions to enter clinical trials: a hypothetical trial of hormone replacement therapy

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Information presentation and decisions to enter clinical trials: a hypothetical trial of hormone replacement therapy. / Wragg, JA; Robinson, EJ; Lilford, Richard.

In: Social Science & Medicine, Vol. 51, No. 3, 01.08.2000, p. 453-62.

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@article{a27d5acd442844a696fd471a798abe14,
title = "Information presentation and decisions to enter clinical trials: a hypothetical trial of hormone replacement therapy",
abstract = "We examined recruitment to an imaginary trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) following two different styles of information about HRT. We predicted that for treatments which, like HRT, are available outside a trial, people offered the facts as currently known would be less likely to remain unsure about the relative costs and benefits, and so less likely to agree to enter a randomised trial. In contrast, when the information provided reflected the current state of uncertainty which justified the trial, we predicted that people would be less likely to form a preference for one treatment arm over the other, and so more likely to agree to enter a trial. One hundred women aged 25-40 years were informed about HRT via a video and an information leaflet. For half the participants the information was framed in a way which emphasised the current state of uncertainty about the relative costs and benefits of HRT, and in that respect it reflected the justification for a trial. This version was considered to be similar in style to information commonly provided to potential trial participants. For half the participants the same information was framed in a way which offered explicit numerical detail about currently known facts, and in that respect it was considered to be similar in style to information commonly available to doctors prior to a trial. Women learned as much about HRT in the two conditions, but women given the explicit versions were more likely (i) to hold a stronger view about whether or not they would take HRT (ratings were not elicited from the first 30 participants in this condition. N = 20, p <0.05 1 tailed) and (ii) to refuse entry to the trial (N = 50, p <0.05 2 tailed). Those who, given the explicit version, agreed rather than refused to enter the trial, scored higher on believing that others control their health (p <0.01 2 tailed).",
author = "JA Wragg and EJ Robinson and Richard Lilford",
year = "2000",
month = aug,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0277-9536(99)00477-3",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "453--62",
journal = "Social Science and Medicine",
issn = "0277-9536",
publisher = "Reed-Elsevier (India) Private Limited",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Information presentation and decisions to enter clinical trials: a hypothetical trial of hormone replacement therapy

AU - Wragg, JA

AU - Robinson, EJ

AU - Lilford, Richard

PY - 2000/8/1

Y1 - 2000/8/1

N2 - We examined recruitment to an imaginary trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) following two different styles of information about HRT. We predicted that for treatments which, like HRT, are available outside a trial, people offered the facts as currently known would be less likely to remain unsure about the relative costs and benefits, and so less likely to agree to enter a randomised trial. In contrast, when the information provided reflected the current state of uncertainty which justified the trial, we predicted that people would be less likely to form a preference for one treatment arm over the other, and so more likely to agree to enter a trial. One hundred women aged 25-40 years were informed about HRT via a video and an information leaflet. For half the participants the information was framed in a way which emphasised the current state of uncertainty about the relative costs and benefits of HRT, and in that respect it reflected the justification for a trial. This version was considered to be similar in style to information commonly provided to potential trial participants. For half the participants the same information was framed in a way which offered explicit numerical detail about currently known facts, and in that respect it was considered to be similar in style to information commonly available to doctors prior to a trial. Women learned as much about HRT in the two conditions, but women given the explicit versions were more likely (i) to hold a stronger view about whether or not they would take HRT (ratings were not elicited from the first 30 participants in this condition. N = 20, p <0.05 1 tailed) and (ii) to refuse entry to the trial (N = 50, p <0.05 2 tailed). Those who, given the explicit version, agreed rather than refused to enter the trial, scored higher on believing that others control their health (p <0.01 2 tailed).

AB - We examined recruitment to an imaginary trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) following two different styles of information about HRT. We predicted that for treatments which, like HRT, are available outside a trial, people offered the facts as currently known would be less likely to remain unsure about the relative costs and benefits, and so less likely to agree to enter a randomised trial. In contrast, when the information provided reflected the current state of uncertainty which justified the trial, we predicted that people would be less likely to form a preference for one treatment arm over the other, and so more likely to agree to enter a trial. One hundred women aged 25-40 years were informed about HRT via a video and an information leaflet. For half the participants the information was framed in a way which emphasised the current state of uncertainty about the relative costs and benefits of HRT, and in that respect it reflected the justification for a trial. This version was considered to be similar in style to information commonly provided to potential trial participants. For half the participants the same information was framed in a way which offered explicit numerical detail about currently known facts, and in that respect it was considered to be similar in style to information commonly available to doctors prior to a trial. Women learned as much about HRT in the two conditions, but women given the explicit versions were more likely (i) to hold a stronger view about whether or not they would take HRT (ratings were not elicited from the first 30 participants in this condition. N = 20, p <0.05 1 tailed) and (ii) to refuse entry to the trial (N = 50, p <0.05 2 tailed). Those who, given the explicit version, agreed rather than refused to enter the trial, scored higher on believing that others control their health (p <0.01 2 tailed).

U2 - 10.1016/S0277-9536(99)00477-3

DO - 10.1016/S0277-9536(99)00477-3

M3 - Article

C2 - 10855931

VL - 51

SP - 453

EP - 462

JO - Social Science and Medicine

JF - Social Science and Medicine

SN - 0277-9536

IS - 3

ER -