Influence of Alzheimer's disease genes on cognitive decline: the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Authors

  • Hongsheng Gui
  • Chao Qiang Jiang
  • Stacey S Cherny
  • Pak Chung Sham
  • Lin Xu
  • Bin Liu
  • Ya Li Jin
  • Tong Zhu
  • Wei Sen Zhang
  • Tai Hing Lam

Abstract

Cognitive decline is a reduction in cognitive ability usually associated with aging, and those with more extreme cognitive decline either have or are at risk of progressing to mild cognitive impairment and dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD). We hypothesized that genetic variants predisposing to AD should be predictive of cognitive decline in elderly individuals. We selected 1325 subjects with extreme cognitive decline and 1083 well-matched control subjects from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study in which more than 30,000 southern Chinese older people have been recruited and followed up. Thirty single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 29 AD-associated genes were genotyped. No statistically significant allelic associations with cognitive decline were found by individual variant analysis. At the level of genotypic association, we confirmed that the APOE ε4 homozygote significantly accelerated cognitive decline and found that carriers of the ACE rs1800764_C allele were more likely to show cognitive decline than noncarriers, particularly in those without college education. However, these effects do not survive after multiple testing corrections, and together they only explain 1.7% of the phenotypic variance in cognitive score change. This study suggests that AD risk variants and/or genes are not powerful predictors of cognitive decline in our Chinese sample.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2422.e3-8
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume35
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2014

Keywords

  • Aged, Alzheimer Disease, Apolipoprotein E4, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Cognition, Cohort Studies, Female, Genetic Association Studies, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Heterozygote, Homozygote, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide