Incidence and prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus among Arab and Chaldean Americans in southeastern Michigan: the Michigan Lupus Epidemiology and Surveillance Program

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Authors

  • Michelle Housey
  • Peter DeGuire
  • Sarah Lyon-Callo
  • Lu Wang
  • Wendy Marder
  • W Joseph McCune
  • Charles G Helmick
  • J Patricia Dhar
  • James Leisen
  • Emily C Somers

Colleges, School and Institutes

External organisations

  • Michigan Department of Community Health, Lansing
  • Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Central Michigan University College of Medicine, Mount Pleasant
  • Henry Ford Health System, Division of Rheumatology, Detroit, MI

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We assessed the burden of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) among Arab and Chaldean Americans residing in southeast Michigan.

METHODS: For those meeting SLE criteria from the Michigan Lupus Epidemiology and Surveillance Registry, we determined Arab or Chaldean ethnicity by links with demographic data from birth certificates and with a database of Arab and Chaldean names. We compared prevalence and incidence of SLE for Arab and Chaldean Americans with estimates for non-Arab and non-Chaldean American Whites and Blacks.

RESULTS: We classified 54 individuals with SLE as Arab and Chaldean Americans. The age-adjusted incidence and prevalence estimates for Arab and Chaldean Americans were 7.6 and 62.6 per 100 000, respectively. Arab and Chaldean Americans had a 2.1-fold excess SLE incidence compared with non-Arab and non-Chaldean American Whites. Arab and Chaldean American women had both significantly higher incidence rates (5.0-fold increase) and prevalence estimates (7.4-fold increase) than did Arab and Chaldean American men.

CONCLUSIONS: Recognizing that Arab and Chaldean Americans experience different disease burdens from Whites is a first step toward earlier diagnosis and designing targeted interventions. Better methods of assigning ethnicity would improve research in this population. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print March 19, 2015: e1-e6. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2014.302423).

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e74-79
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume105
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 19 Mar 2015