In situ TEM observation of a microcrucible mechanism of nanowire growth

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In situ TEM observation of a microcrucible mechanism of nanowire growth. / Boston, Rebecca; Schnepp, Zoe; Nemoto, Yoshihiro; Sakka, Yoshio; Hall, Simon.

In: Science, Vol. 344, No. 6184, 09.05.2014, p. 623-626.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Boston, R, Schnepp, Z, Nemoto, Y, Sakka, Y & Hall, S 2014, 'In situ TEM observation of a microcrucible mechanism of nanowire growth', Science, vol. 344, no. 6184, pp. 623-626. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1251594

APA

Vancouver

Author

Boston, Rebecca ; Schnepp, Zoe ; Nemoto, Yoshihiro ; Sakka, Yoshio ; Hall, Simon. / In situ TEM observation of a microcrucible mechanism of nanowire growth. In: Science. 2014 ; Vol. 344, No. 6184. pp. 623-626.

Bibtex

@article{f621f83ca62e4921b2c6e44c23919051,
title = "In situ TEM observation of a microcrucible mechanism of nanowire growth",
abstract = "The growth of metal oxide nanowires can proceed via a number of mechanisms such as screw dislocation, vapor-liquid-solid process, or seeded growth. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can resolve nanowires but invariably lacks the facility for direct observation of how nanowires form. We used a transmission electron microscope equipped with an in situ heating stage to follow the growth of quaternary metal oxide nanowires. Video-rate imaging revealed barium carbonate nanoparticles diffusing through a porous matrix containing copper and yttrium oxides to subsequently act as catalytic sites for the outgrowth of YBaCuO nanowires on reaching the surface. The results suggest that sites on the rough surface of the porous matrix act as microcrucibles and thus provide insights into the mechanisms that drive metal oxide nanowire growth at high temperatures.",
author = "Rebecca Boston and Zoe Schnepp and Yoshihiro Nemoto and Yoshio Sakka and Simon Hall",
year = "2014",
month = may,
day = "9",
doi = "10.1126/science.1251594",
language = "English",
volume = "344",
pages = "623--626",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "6184",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - In situ TEM observation of a microcrucible mechanism of nanowire growth

AU - Boston, Rebecca

AU - Schnepp, Zoe

AU - Nemoto, Yoshihiro

AU - Sakka, Yoshio

AU - Hall, Simon

PY - 2014/5/9

Y1 - 2014/5/9

N2 - The growth of metal oxide nanowires can proceed via a number of mechanisms such as screw dislocation, vapor-liquid-solid process, or seeded growth. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can resolve nanowires but invariably lacks the facility for direct observation of how nanowires form. We used a transmission electron microscope equipped with an in situ heating stage to follow the growth of quaternary metal oxide nanowires. Video-rate imaging revealed barium carbonate nanoparticles diffusing through a porous matrix containing copper and yttrium oxides to subsequently act as catalytic sites for the outgrowth of YBaCuO nanowires on reaching the surface. The results suggest that sites on the rough surface of the porous matrix act as microcrucibles and thus provide insights into the mechanisms that drive metal oxide nanowire growth at high temperatures.

AB - The growth of metal oxide nanowires can proceed via a number of mechanisms such as screw dislocation, vapor-liquid-solid process, or seeded growth. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can resolve nanowires but invariably lacks the facility for direct observation of how nanowires form. We used a transmission electron microscope equipped with an in situ heating stage to follow the growth of quaternary metal oxide nanowires. Video-rate imaging revealed barium carbonate nanoparticles diffusing through a porous matrix containing copper and yttrium oxides to subsequently act as catalytic sites for the outgrowth of YBaCuO nanowires on reaching the surface. The results suggest that sites on the rough surface of the porous matrix act as microcrucibles and thus provide insights into the mechanisms that drive metal oxide nanowire growth at high temperatures.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84900332433&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1126/science.1251594

DO - 10.1126/science.1251594

M3 - Article

C2 - 24812400

AN - SCOPUS:84900332433

VL - 344

SP - 623

EP - 626

JO - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 6184

ER -