Impact of acute dynamic exercise on radial artery low-flow mediated constriction in humans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Authors

Colleges, School and Institutes

Abstract

Purpose A “low-flow mediated constriction” (L-FMC) is evoked in the radial artery by the inflation of an ipsilateral wrist cuff to a supra-systolic pressure. We sought to test the hypothesis that the radial artery L-FMC response is augmented immediately following acute dynamic leg exercise in young healthy individuals. Methods Ten healthy and recreationally active men (23 ± 4 years) undertook a 30-min trial of incremental dynamic leg cycling exercise (10 min at 50, 100 and 150 W) and a 30-min time control trial (seated rest). Trials were randomly assigned and performed on separate days. Radial artery characteristics (diameter, blood flow and shear rate) were assessed throughout each trial, with L-FMC and flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) assessments conducted prior to and immediately following (10 min) trials. Results Dynamic leg cycling exercise increased radial artery blood flow, along with mean, retrograde and anterograde shear rate (P < 0.05). Blood flow profiles were unchanged during the time control trial (P > 0.05). Following exercise L-FMC was increased (mean [SD]; − 5.6 [3.3] vs. − 10.1 [3.8] %, P < 0.05), while it was not different in the time control condition (− 8.1 [3.2] vs. − 6.7 [3.4] %, P > 0.05). FMD was not different following either the exercise or time control trials (P > 0.05), but the composite end-point of L-FMC + FMD was enhanced post-exercise (P < 0.05). Conclusions Dynamic exercise with a large muscle mass acutely augments the vasoconstrictor response of the radial artery in response to a reduction in blood flow (L-FMC) in young healthy individuals. The time course of this post-exercise response and the underlying vasoregulatory mechanisms require elucidation.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1463-1472
JournalEuropean journal of applied physiology
Volume118
Issue number7
Early online date10 May 2018
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018