Identifying symptoms of ovarian cancer: a qualitative and quantitative study

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Identifying symptoms of ovarian cancer: a qualitative and quantitative study. / Bankhead, C; Collins, C; Stokes-Lampard, Helen; Rose, P; Wilson, S; Clements, A; Mant, D; Kehoe, Sean; Austoker, J.

In: BJOG, Vol. 115, No. 8, 01.07.2008, p. 1008-1014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Bankhead, C, Collins, C, Stokes-Lampard, H, Rose, P, Wilson, S, Clements, A, Mant, D, Kehoe, S & Austoker, J 2008, 'Identifying symptoms of ovarian cancer: a qualitative and quantitative study', BJOG, vol. 115, no. 8, pp. 1008-1014. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2008.01772.x

APA

Bankhead, C., Collins, C., Stokes-Lampard, H., Rose, P., Wilson, S., Clements, A., Mant, D., Kehoe, S., & Austoker, J. (2008). Identifying symptoms of ovarian cancer: a qualitative and quantitative study. BJOG, 115(8), 1008-1014. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2008.01772.x

Vancouver

Author

Bankhead, C ; Collins, C ; Stokes-Lampard, Helen ; Rose, P ; Wilson, S ; Clements, A ; Mant, D ; Kehoe, Sean ; Austoker, J. / Identifying symptoms of ovarian cancer: a qualitative and quantitative study. In: BJOG. 2008 ; Vol. 115, No. 8. pp. 1008-1014.

Bibtex

@article{41a02d45fa21430fbd85cbf4c5c338b8,
title = "Identifying symptoms of ovarian cancer: a qualitative and quantitative study",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Symptoms of ovarian cancer are often vague and consequently a high proportion of women with ovarian cancer are not referred to the appropriate clinic. OBJECTIVE: To identify diagnostic factors for ovarian cancer. DESIGN: A qualitative and quantitative study. SETTING: Four UK hospitals. SAMPLE: One hundred and twenty-four women referred to hospital with suspected ovarian malignancy. METHODS: Women were interviewed prior to diagnosis (n = 63), or soon after. A thematic analysis was conducted. Emergent symptoms were quantitatively analysed to identify distinguishing features of ovarian cancer. MAIN OUTCOMES: Symptoms in women with and without ovarian cancer. RESULTS: Diagnoses comprised 44 malignancies, 59 benign gynaecological pathologies and 21 normal findings. Of the malignancies, 25 women had stage III or more disease, with an average age of 59 years. The benign/normal cohort was significantly younger (48 years). Multivariate analysis revealed persistent abdominal distension (OR 5.2, 95% CI 1.3-20.5), postmenopausal bleeding (OR 9.2, 95% CI 1.1-76.1), appetite loss (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9.2), early satiety (OR 5.0, 95% CI 1.6-15.7) and progressive symptoms (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.3-9.8) as independent, statistically significant variables associated with ovarian cancer. Fluctuating distension was not associated with ovarian cancer (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0-4.1). Women frequently used the term bloating, but this represented two distinct events: persistent abdominal distension and fluctuating distension/discomfort. CONCLUSIONS: Ovarian cancer is not a silent killer. Clinicians should distinguish between persistent and fluctuating distension. Recognition of the significance of symptoms described by women could lead to earlier and more appropriate referral.",
keywords = "symptoms, ovarian cancer, referral, mixed methods, diagnosis",
author = "C Bankhead and C Collins and Helen Stokes-Lampard and P Rose and S Wilson and A Clements and D Mant and Sean Kehoe and J Austoker",
year = "2008",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1471-0528.2008.01772.x",
language = "English",
volume = "115",
pages = "1008--1014",
journal = "BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology",
issn = "1470-0328",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Identifying symptoms of ovarian cancer: a qualitative and quantitative study

AU - Bankhead, C

AU - Collins, C

AU - Stokes-Lampard, Helen

AU - Rose, P

AU - Wilson, S

AU - Clements, A

AU - Mant, D

AU - Kehoe, Sean

AU - Austoker, J

PY - 2008/7/1

Y1 - 2008/7/1

N2 - INTRODUCTION: Symptoms of ovarian cancer are often vague and consequently a high proportion of women with ovarian cancer are not referred to the appropriate clinic. OBJECTIVE: To identify diagnostic factors for ovarian cancer. DESIGN: A qualitative and quantitative study. SETTING: Four UK hospitals. SAMPLE: One hundred and twenty-four women referred to hospital with suspected ovarian malignancy. METHODS: Women were interviewed prior to diagnosis (n = 63), or soon after. A thematic analysis was conducted. Emergent symptoms were quantitatively analysed to identify distinguishing features of ovarian cancer. MAIN OUTCOMES: Symptoms in women with and without ovarian cancer. RESULTS: Diagnoses comprised 44 malignancies, 59 benign gynaecological pathologies and 21 normal findings. Of the malignancies, 25 women had stage III or more disease, with an average age of 59 years. The benign/normal cohort was significantly younger (48 years). Multivariate analysis revealed persistent abdominal distension (OR 5.2, 95% CI 1.3-20.5), postmenopausal bleeding (OR 9.2, 95% CI 1.1-76.1), appetite loss (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9.2), early satiety (OR 5.0, 95% CI 1.6-15.7) and progressive symptoms (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.3-9.8) as independent, statistically significant variables associated with ovarian cancer. Fluctuating distension was not associated with ovarian cancer (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0-4.1). Women frequently used the term bloating, but this represented two distinct events: persistent abdominal distension and fluctuating distension/discomfort. CONCLUSIONS: Ovarian cancer is not a silent killer. Clinicians should distinguish between persistent and fluctuating distension. Recognition of the significance of symptoms described by women could lead to earlier and more appropriate referral.

AB - INTRODUCTION: Symptoms of ovarian cancer are often vague and consequently a high proportion of women with ovarian cancer are not referred to the appropriate clinic. OBJECTIVE: To identify diagnostic factors for ovarian cancer. DESIGN: A qualitative and quantitative study. SETTING: Four UK hospitals. SAMPLE: One hundred and twenty-four women referred to hospital with suspected ovarian malignancy. METHODS: Women were interviewed prior to diagnosis (n = 63), or soon after. A thematic analysis was conducted. Emergent symptoms were quantitatively analysed to identify distinguishing features of ovarian cancer. MAIN OUTCOMES: Symptoms in women with and without ovarian cancer. RESULTS: Diagnoses comprised 44 malignancies, 59 benign gynaecological pathologies and 21 normal findings. Of the malignancies, 25 women had stage III or more disease, with an average age of 59 years. The benign/normal cohort was significantly younger (48 years). Multivariate analysis revealed persistent abdominal distension (OR 5.2, 95% CI 1.3-20.5), postmenopausal bleeding (OR 9.2, 95% CI 1.1-76.1), appetite loss (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9.2), early satiety (OR 5.0, 95% CI 1.6-15.7) and progressive symptoms (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.3-9.8) as independent, statistically significant variables associated with ovarian cancer. Fluctuating distension was not associated with ovarian cancer (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0-4.1). Women frequently used the term bloating, but this represented two distinct events: persistent abdominal distension and fluctuating distension/discomfort. CONCLUSIONS: Ovarian cancer is not a silent killer. Clinicians should distinguish between persistent and fluctuating distension. Recognition of the significance of symptoms described by women could lead to earlier and more appropriate referral.

KW - symptoms

KW - ovarian cancer

KW - referral

KW - mixed methods

KW - diagnosis

U2 - 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2008.01772.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2008.01772.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 18651882

VL - 115

SP - 1008

EP - 1014

JO - BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology

JF - BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology

SN - 1470-0328

IS - 8

ER -