‘I can’t forget’: experiences of violence and disclosure in the childhoods of disabled women

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‘I can’t forget’ : experiences of violence and disclosure in the childhoods of disabled women. / Shah, Sonali; Tsitsou, Lito; Woodin, Sarah.

In: Childhood, Vol. 23, No. 4, 01.11.2016, p. 521-536.

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@article{5c3957500e064cfe91325ad790dc9666,
title = "{\textquoteleft}I can{\textquoteright}t forget{\textquoteright}: experiences of violence and disclosure in the childhoods of disabled women",
abstract = "Violence against children is a human rights problem that cuts across gender, race, geographical, religious, socio-economic status and cultural boundaries. The risk of violence towards disabled children during their lifetime is three to four times greater than towards non-disabled children. It starts in early childhood, is more severe and linked to disablist structures in society. Violence is perpetrated by individuals and through institutional practices that are part of disabled children{\textquoteright}s everyday life. Violence is often misdiagnosed as related to individual impairment, and not recognised by professionals or the victims themselves. Presenting disabled women{\textquoteright}s reflections of childhood violence, help-seeking and responses to disclosure, this article seeks to raise an awareness of violence towards disabled girls and the need for these to be recognised as a serious child protection issue to be included in official definitions of child abuse.",
keywords = "childhood, disablism, disclosure, life history, violence, women",
author = "Sonali Shah and Lito Tsitsou and Sarah Woodin",
note = "Shah, S., Tsitsou, L., & Woodin, S. (2016). {\textquoteleft}I can{\textquoteright}t forget{\textquoteright}: Experiences of violence and disclosure in the childhoods of disabled women. Childhood, 23(4), 521–536. https://doi.org/10.1177/0907568215626781",
year = "2016",
month = nov
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0907568215626781",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "521--536",
journal = "Childhood",
issn = "0907-5682",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - ‘I can’t forget’

T2 - experiences of violence and disclosure in the childhoods of disabled women

AU - Shah, Sonali

AU - Tsitsou, Lito

AU - Woodin, Sarah

N1 - Shah, S., Tsitsou, L., & Woodin, S. (2016). ‘I can’t forget’: Experiences of violence and disclosure in the childhoods of disabled women. Childhood, 23(4), 521–536. https://doi.org/10.1177/0907568215626781

PY - 2016/11/1

Y1 - 2016/11/1

N2 - Violence against children is a human rights problem that cuts across gender, race, geographical, religious, socio-economic status and cultural boundaries. The risk of violence towards disabled children during their lifetime is three to four times greater than towards non-disabled children. It starts in early childhood, is more severe and linked to disablist structures in society. Violence is perpetrated by individuals and through institutional practices that are part of disabled children’s everyday life. Violence is often misdiagnosed as related to individual impairment, and not recognised by professionals or the victims themselves. Presenting disabled women’s reflections of childhood violence, help-seeking and responses to disclosure, this article seeks to raise an awareness of violence towards disabled girls and the need for these to be recognised as a serious child protection issue to be included in official definitions of child abuse.

AB - Violence against children is a human rights problem that cuts across gender, race, geographical, religious, socio-economic status and cultural boundaries. The risk of violence towards disabled children during their lifetime is three to four times greater than towards non-disabled children. It starts in early childhood, is more severe and linked to disablist structures in society. Violence is perpetrated by individuals and through institutional practices that are part of disabled children’s everyday life. Violence is often misdiagnosed as related to individual impairment, and not recognised by professionals or the victims themselves. Presenting disabled women’s reflections of childhood violence, help-seeking and responses to disclosure, this article seeks to raise an awareness of violence towards disabled girls and the need for these to be recognised as a serious child protection issue to be included in official definitions of child abuse.

KW - childhood

KW - disablism

KW - disclosure

KW - life history

KW - violence

KW - women

U2 - 10.1177/0907568215626781

DO - 10.1177/0907568215626781

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 521

EP - 536

JO - Childhood

JF - Childhood

SN - 0907-5682

IS - 4

ER -