Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectiveness and potential herd immunity for reducing oncogenic oropharyngeal HPV16 prevalence in the UK: a cross-sectional study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectiveness and potential herd immunity for reducing oncogenic oropharyngeal HPV16 prevalence in the UK : a cross-sectional study. / Mehanna, Hesham; Bryant, Tyler S; Babrah, Jaspreet; Louie, Karly; Bryant, Jennifer; Spruce, Rachel; Batis, Nikolaos; Olaleye, Oladejo; Jones, June; Struijk, Linda; Molijn, Anco; Vorsters, Alex; Rosillon, Dominique; Taylor, Sylvia; D’Souza, Gypsyamber.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, 12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Mehanna, Hesham ; Bryant, Tyler S ; Babrah, Jaspreet ; Louie, Karly ; Bryant, Jennifer ; Spruce, Rachel ; Batis, Nikolaos ; Olaleye, Oladejo ; Jones, June ; Struijk, Linda ; Molijn, Anco ; Vorsters, Alex ; Rosillon, Dominique ; Taylor, Sylvia ; D’Souza, Gypsyamber. / Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectiveness and potential herd immunity for reducing oncogenic oropharyngeal HPV16 prevalence in the UK : a cross-sectional study. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2018.

Bibtex

@article{92dbc29796914577806bc3a4cc80d166,
title = "Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectiveness and potential herd immunity for reducing oncogenic oropharyngeal HPV16 prevalence in the UK: a cross-sectional study",
abstract = "Background: Oropharyngeal cancer incidence is rapidly rising due to human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infection. The dearth of data on effectiveness of national girl-only vaccination program in preventing oral HPV infection and the potential herd immunity effect on unvaccinated boys has resulted in considerable controversy regarding the need to vaccinate boys, especially in countries with high vaccination coverage of girls. Methods: Subjects aged 0-65 years undergoing tonsillectomy for non-malignant indications were recruited in 6 UK hospitals. Oral samples were collected in following order: oral rinse, tongue base and pharyngeal wall brushes, then tonsil tissue (tonsillectomy). Vaccination data was obtained from regional health authorities. All samples were centrally tested for HPV-DNA by PCR amplification. (NCT01330147).Results: Of 940 subjects, 243 girls and 69 boys were aged 12-24; median age 18.6 years. 189 (78%) girls and no boys received HPV vaccination. Overall, oropharyngeal-HPV16 prevalence in vaccinated girls was significantly lower than unvaccinated girls (0.5% vs 5.6%, p=0.04). In contrast, prevalence of any oropharyngeal-HPV type was similar in vaccinated and unvaccinated girls (19% vs 20%, p=0.76). Oropharyngeal-HPV16 prevalence in (unvaccinated) boys was similar to vaccinated girls (0% vs 0.5%, p>0.99), and lower than unvaccinated girls (0% vs 5.6%, p=0.08). Conclusions: Our findings indicate that the UK girl-only national vaccination program is associated with significant reductions in oropharyngeal-HPV16 infections in children and young adults. This is also the first data to suggest potential herd immunity from girl-only vaccination against oropharyngeal HPV infection in contemporaneously-aged boys. ",
keywords = "head and neck cancer, vaccination, oropharyngeal cancer, cancer prevention, clinical trial",
author = "Hesham Mehanna and Bryant, {Tyler S} and Jaspreet Babrah and Karly Louie and Jennifer Bryant and Rachel Spruce and Nikolaos Batis and Oladejo Olaleye and June Jones and Linda Struijk and Anco Molijn and Alex Vorsters and Dominique Rosillon and Sylvia Taylor and Gypsyamber D{\textquoteright}Souza",
year = "2018",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1093/cid/ciy1081",
language = "English",
journal = "Clinical Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1058-4838",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectiveness and potential herd immunity for reducing oncogenic oropharyngeal HPV16 prevalence in the UK

T2 - a cross-sectional study

AU - Mehanna, Hesham

AU - Bryant, Tyler S

AU - Babrah, Jaspreet

AU - Louie, Karly

AU - Bryant, Jennifer

AU - Spruce, Rachel

AU - Batis, Nikolaos

AU - Olaleye, Oladejo

AU - Jones, June

AU - Struijk, Linda

AU - Molijn, Anco

AU - Vorsters, Alex

AU - Rosillon, Dominique

AU - Taylor, Sylvia

AU - D’Souza, Gypsyamber

PY - 2018/12

Y1 - 2018/12

N2 - Background: Oropharyngeal cancer incidence is rapidly rising due to human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infection. The dearth of data on effectiveness of national girl-only vaccination program in preventing oral HPV infection and the potential herd immunity effect on unvaccinated boys has resulted in considerable controversy regarding the need to vaccinate boys, especially in countries with high vaccination coverage of girls. Methods: Subjects aged 0-65 years undergoing tonsillectomy for non-malignant indications were recruited in 6 UK hospitals. Oral samples were collected in following order: oral rinse, tongue base and pharyngeal wall brushes, then tonsil tissue (tonsillectomy). Vaccination data was obtained from regional health authorities. All samples were centrally tested for HPV-DNA by PCR amplification. (NCT01330147).Results: Of 940 subjects, 243 girls and 69 boys were aged 12-24; median age 18.6 years. 189 (78%) girls and no boys received HPV vaccination. Overall, oropharyngeal-HPV16 prevalence in vaccinated girls was significantly lower than unvaccinated girls (0.5% vs 5.6%, p=0.04). In contrast, prevalence of any oropharyngeal-HPV type was similar in vaccinated and unvaccinated girls (19% vs 20%, p=0.76). Oropharyngeal-HPV16 prevalence in (unvaccinated) boys was similar to vaccinated girls (0% vs 0.5%, p>0.99), and lower than unvaccinated girls (0% vs 5.6%, p=0.08). Conclusions: Our findings indicate that the UK girl-only national vaccination program is associated with significant reductions in oropharyngeal-HPV16 infections in children and young adults. This is also the first data to suggest potential herd immunity from girl-only vaccination against oropharyngeal HPV infection in contemporaneously-aged boys.

AB - Background: Oropharyngeal cancer incidence is rapidly rising due to human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infection. The dearth of data on effectiveness of national girl-only vaccination program in preventing oral HPV infection and the potential herd immunity effect on unvaccinated boys has resulted in considerable controversy regarding the need to vaccinate boys, especially in countries with high vaccination coverage of girls. Methods: Subjects aged 0-65 years undergoing tonsillectomy for non-malignant indications were recruited in 6 UK hospitals. Oral samples were collected in following order: oral rinse, tongue base and pharyngeal wall brushes, then tonsil tissue (tonsillectomy). Vaccination data was obtained from regional health authorities. All samples were centrally tested for HPV-DNA by PCR amplification. (NCT01330147).Results: Of 940 subjects, 243 girls and 69 boys were aged 12-24; median age 18.6 years. 189 (78%) girls and no boys received HPV vaccination. Overall, oropharyngeal-HPV16 prevalence in vaccinated girls was significantly lower than unvaccinated girls (0.5% vs 5.6%, p=0.04). In contrast, prevalence of any oropharyngeal-HPV type was similar in vaccinated and unvaccinated girls (19% vs 20%, p=0.76). Oropharyngeal-HPV16 prevalence in (unvaccinated) boys was similar to vaccinated girls (0% vs 0.5%, p>0.99), and lower than unvaccinated girls (0% vs 5.6%, p=0.08). Conclusions: Our findings indicate that the UK girl-only national vaccination program is associated with significant reductions in oropharyngeal-HPV16 infections in children and young adults. This is also the first data to suggest potential herd immunity from girl-only vaccination against oropharyngeal HPV infection in contemporaneously-aged boys.

KW - head and neck cancer

KW - vaccination

KW - oropharyngeal cancer

KW - cancer prevention

KW - clinical trial

UR - http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/30590469

U2 - 10.1093/cid/ciy1081

DO - 10.1093/cid/ciy1081

M3 - Article

C2 - 30590469

JO - Clinical Infectious Diseases

JF - Clinical Infectious Diseases

SN - 1058-4838

ER -