How strong is the temperature increase due to a moving dislocation?

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How strong is the temperature increase due to a moving dislocation? / Gurrutxaga-Lerma, Beñat.

In: International Journal of Solids and Structures, Vol. 108, 01.03.2017, p. 263-274.

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@article{4bca8062a54941d3bffadc7045d33ce3,
title = "How strong is the temperature increase due to a moving dislocation?",
abstract = "This article calculates the temperature increase resulting from the motion of a dislocation. The temperature rise is ascribed to two separate effects, both of which are calculated: the dissipative effect resulting from the energy lost by the dislocation as it overcomes the intrinsic lattice resistance to its motion; and the thermomechanical effect arising from the constrained changes in volume the dilatational field of a moving dislocation may entail. The dissipative effect is studied in an uncoupled continuum solid, whilst the thermomechanical effect is studied in a fully coupled thermo-elastodynamic continuum. Explicit solutions are provided, as well as asymptotic estimates of the temperature field in the immediacy of the dislocation core.",
keywords = "Edge dislocation, Moving dislocation, Temperature, Thermoelasticity",
author = "Be{\~n}at Gurrutxaga-Lerma",
year = "2017",
month = mar,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijsolstr.2016.12.026",
language = "English",
volume = "108",
pages = "263--274",
journal = "International Journal of Solids and Structures",
issn = "0020-7683",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - How strong is the temperature increase due to a moving dislocation?

AU - Gurrutxaga-Lerma, Beñat

PY - 2017/3/1

Y1 - 2017/3/1

N2 - This article calculates the temperature increase resulting from the motion of a dislocation. The temperature rise is ascribed to two separate effects, both of which are calculated: the dissipative effect resulting from the energy lost by the dislocation as it overcomes the intrinsic lattice resistance to its motion; and the thermomechanical effect arising from the constrained changes in volume the dilatational field of a moving dislocation may entail. The dissipative effect is studied in an uncoupled continuum solid, whilst the thermomechanical effect is studied in a fully coupled thermo-elastodynamic continuum. Explicit solutions are provided, as well as asymptotic estimates of the temperature field in the immediacy of the dislocation core.

AB - This article calculates the temperature increase resulting from the motion of a dislocation. The temperature rise is ascribed to two separate effects, both of which are calculated: the dissipative effect resulting from the energy lost by the dislocation as it overcomes the intrinsic lattice resistance to its motion; and the thermomechanical effect arising from the constrained changes in volume the dilatational field of a moving dislocation may entail. The dissipative effect is studied in an uncoupled continuum solid, whilst the thermomechanical effect is studied in a fully coupled thermo-elastodynamic continuum. Explicit solutions are provided, as well as asymptotic estimates of the temperature field in the immediacy of the dislocation core.

KW - Edge dislocation

KW - Moving dislocation

KW - Temperature

KW - Thermoelasticity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85009461261&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijsolstr.2016.12.026

DO - 10.1016/j.ijsolstr.2016.12.026

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85009461261

VL - 108

SP - 263

EP - 274

JO - International Journal of Solids and Structures

JF - International Journal of Solids and Structures

SN - 0020-7683

ER -