Hospital delay in South Asian patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction in the UK.

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Hospital delay in South Asian patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction in the UK. / Kendall, H; Marley, A; Patel, Jeetesh; Khan, JM; Blann, Andrew; Lip, Gregory; Dwivedi, Girish.

In: European journal of preventive cardiology, 26.04.2012.

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@article{685a903187624d8c87465d8dc1fa8e77,
title = "Hospital delay in South Asian patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction in the UK.",
abstract = "Background: South Asians presenting with chest pain in the UK experience disproportionately greater delays with respect to diagnosis and treatment for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The duration of time between symptom onset and hospital intervention is a critical delay for AMI but there are limited data amongst South Asians. The objectives of this study were to investigate ethnic differences in hospital delay and to look at short-term outcomes in South Asian and White patients presenting with AMI.Methods: Between 2004 and 2009, data were collected from 672 AMI patients with ST elevation who subsequently received percutaneous coronary intervention at Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust (UK). The hospital delay between the onset of symptoms and arrival time (pre-hospital), and between arrival time and intervention (post-hospital) was calculated.Results: South Asians were more likely to be in the upper tertile of hospital delay (pre-hospital odds ratio, OR, 1.44, 95% CI 0.93-2.24, p = 0.06; post-hospital OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.05-3.21, p = 0.015), contributing to an overall hospital delay that was longer (median 314, interquartile range, IQR, 195-679 min) than in Whites (median 240, IQR 182-468 min). Women were more likely to be in the upper tertile for pre-hospital delay than men (p = 0.01) and South Asian ethnicity was an independent predictor of post-hospital delay (p = 0.003).Conclusions: While the reasons for ethnic differences in AMI-related hospital delay are likely to be multifactorial and complex, there is an urgent need to promote change in both the South Asian patient (delays in arrival) and their treatment (delays in intervention).",
author = "H Kendall and A Marley and Jeetesh Patel and JM Khan and Andrew Blann and Gregory Lip and Girish Dwivedi",
year = "2012",
month = apr
day = "26",
doi = "10.1177/2047487312447844",
language = "English",
journal = "European journal of preventive cardiology",
issn = "2047-4873",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hospital delay in South Asian patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction in the UK.

AU - Kendall, H

AU - Marley, A

AU - Patel, Jeetesh

AU - Khan, JM

AU - Blann, Andrew

AU - Lip, Gregory

AU - Dwivedi, Girish

PY - 2012/4/26

Y1 - 2012/4/26

N2 - Background: South Asians presenting with chest pain in the UK experience disproportionately greater delays with respect to diagnosis and treatment for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The duration of time between symptom onset and hospital intervention is a critical delay for AMI but there are limited data amongst South Asians. The objectives of this study were to investigate ethnic differences in hospital delay and to look at short-term outcomes in South Asian and White patients presenting with AMI.Methods: Between 2004 and 2009, data were collected from 672 AMI patients with ST elevation who subsequently received percutaneous coronary intervention at Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust (UK). The hospital delay between the onset of symptoms and arrival time (pre-hospital), and between arrival time and intervention (post-hospital) was calculated.Results: South Asians were more likely to be in the upper tertile of hospital delay (pre-hospital odds ratio, OR, 1.44, 95% CI 0.93-2.24, p = 0.06; post-hospital OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.05-3.21, p = 0.015), contributing to an overall hospital delay that was longer (median 314, interquartile range, IQR, 195-679 min) than in Whites (median 240, IQR 182-468 min). Women were more likely to be in the upper tertile for pre-hospital delay than men (p = 0.01) and South Asian ethnicity was an independent predictor of post-hospital delay (p = 0.003).Conclusions: While the reasons for ethnic differences in AMI-related hospital delay are likely to be multifactorial and complex, there is an urgent need to promote change in both the South Asian patient (delays in arrival) and their treatment (delays in intervention).

AB - Background: South Asians presenting with chest pain in the UK experience disproportionately greater delays with respect to diagnosis and treatment for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The duration of time between symptom onset and hospital intervention is a critical delay for AMI but there are limited data amongst South Asians. The objectives of this study were to investigate ethnic differences in hospital delay and to look at short-term outcomes in South Asian and White patients presenting with AMI.Methods: Between 2004 and 2009, data were collected from 672 AMI patients with ST elevation who subsequently received percutaneous coronary intervention at Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust (UK). The hospital delay between the onset of symptoms and arrival time (pre-hospital), and between arrival time and intervention (post-hospital) was calculated.Results: South Asians were more likely to be in the upper tertile of hospital delay (pre-hospital odds ratio, OR, 1.44, 95% CI 0.93-2.24, p = 0.06; post-hospital OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.05-3.21, p = 0.015), contributing to an overall hospital delay that was longer (median 314, interquartile range, IQR, 195-679 min) than in Whites (median 240, IQR 182-468 min). Women were more likely to be in the upper tertile for pre-hospital delay than men (p = 0.01) and South Asian ethnicity was an independent predictor of post-hospital delay (p = 0.003).Conclusions: While the reasons for ethnic differences in AMI-related hospital delay are likely to be multifactorial and complex, there is an urgent need to promote change in both the South Asian patient (delays in arrival) and their treatment (delays in intervention).

U2 - 10.1177/2047487312447844

DO - 10.1177/2047487312447844

M3 - Article

C2 - 22539810

JO - European journal of preventive cardiology

JF - European journal of preventive cardiology

SN - 2047-4873

ER -