Home-based versus hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction or revascularisation: design and rationale of the Birmingham Uptake Maximisation Study (BRUM): a randomised controlled trial

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@article{5f328cb10ad74afcae4bfe27303bc36f,
title = "Home-based versus hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction or revascularisation: design and rationale of the Birmingham Uptake Maximisation Study (BRUM): a randomised controlled trial",
abstract = "Background: Cardiac rehabilitation following myocardial infarction reduces subsequent mortality, but uptake and adherence to rehabilitation programmes remains poor, particularly among women, the elderly and ethnic minority groups. Evidence of the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation remains limited. This trial evaluates the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of homebased compared to hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation. Methods/design: A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of home-based compared with hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation in four hospitals serving a multi-ethnic inner city population in the United Kingdom was designed. The home programme is nurse-facilitated, manual-based using the Heart Manual. The hospital programmes offer comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation in an outpatient setting. Patients: We will randomise 650 adult, English or Punjabi-speaking patients of low-medium risk following myocardial infarction, coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft who have been referred for cardiac rehabilitation. Main outcome measures: Serum cholesterol, smoking cessation, blood pressure, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score, distance walked on Shuttle walk-test measured at 6, 12 and 24 months. Adherence to the programmes will be estimated using patient self-reports of activity.",
author = "Catherine Jolly and Gregory Lip and Josie Sandercock and Sheila Greenfield and James Raftery and Rodney Taylor and {Wai Lee}, K and Jonathan Mant and Andrew Stevens and Deirdre Lane",
year = "2003",
month = sep,
day = "10",
doi = "10.1186/1471-2261-3-10",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
journal = "BMC Cardiovascular Disorders",
issn = "1471-2261",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Home-based versus hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction or revascularisation: design and rationale of the Birmingham Uptake Maximisation Study (BRUM): a randomised controlled trial

AU - Jolly, Catherine

AU - Lip, Gregory

AU - Sandercock, Josie

AU - Greenfield, Sheila

AU - Raftery, James

AU - Taylor, Rodney

AU - Wai Lee, K

AU - Mant, Jonathan

AU - Stevens, Andrew

AU - Lane, Deirdre

PY - 2003/9/10

Y1 - 2003/9/10

N2 - Background: Cardiac rehabilitation following myocardial infarction reduces subsequent mortality, but uptake and adherence to rehabilitation programmes remains poor, particularly among women, the elderly and ethnic minority groups. Evidence of the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation remains limited. This trial evaluates the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of homebased compared to hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation. Methods/design: A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of home-based compared with hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation in four hospitals serving a multi-ethnic inner city population in the United Kingdom was designed. The home programme is nurse-facilitated, manual-based using the Heart Manual. The hospital programmes offer comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation in an outpatient setting. Patients: We will randomise 650 adult, English or Punjabi-speaking patients of low-medium risk following myocardial infarction, coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft who have been referred for cardiac rehabilitation. Main outcome measures: Serum cholesterol, smoking cessation, blood pressure, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score, distance walked on Shuttle walk-test measured at 6, 12 and 24 months. Adherence to the programmes will be estimated using patient self-reports of activity.

AB - Background: Cardiac rehabilitation following myocardial infarction reduces subsequent mortality, but uptake and adherence to rehabilitation programmes remains poor, particularly among women, the elderly and ethnic minority groups. Evidence of the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation remains limited. This trial evaluates the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of homebased compared to hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation. Methods/design: A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of home-based compared with hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation in four hospitals serving a multi-ethnic inner city population in the United Kingdom was designed. The home programme is nurse-facilitated, manual-based using the Heart Manual. The hospital programmes offer comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation in an outpatient setting. Patients: We will randomise 650 adult, English or Punjabi-speaking patients of low-medium risk following myocardial infarction, coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft who have been referred for cardiac rehabilitation. Main outcome measures: Serum cholesterol, smoking cessation, blood pressure, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score, distance walked on Shuttle walk-test measured at 6, 12 and 24 months. Adherence to the programmes will be estimated using patient self-reports of activity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0642342508&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/1471-2261-3-10

DO - 10.1186/1471-2261-3-10

M3 - Article

C2 - 12964946

VL - 3

JO - BMC Cardiovascular Disorders

JF - BMC Cardiovascular Disorders

SN - 1471-2261

IS - 1

ER -