Histories of ‘Sex’, Histories of ‘Sexuality’

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Histories of ‘Sex’, Histories of ‘Sexuality’. / Harris, Victoria.

In: Contemporary European History, Vol. 22, No. 02, 01.05.2013, p. 295-301.

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@article{49a8a240b02b4069838bc27c7a83498e,
title = "Histories of {\textquoteleft}Sex{\textquoteright}, Histories of {\textquoteleft}Sexuality{\textquoteright}",
abstract = "For Dagmar Herzog, writing the history of sexuality is an act of rebalancing. Sexuality becomes neither positive nor negative, but ambivalent. Herzog destabilises a dominant {\textquoteleft}narrative of gradual progress{\textquoteright}, which misunderstands {\textquoteleft}how profoundly complicated the sexual politics of the twentieth century in Europe actually were{\textquoteright} (p. 2). Instead of a linear chronology, Herzog reveals a twentieth century of cyclical change – revolutionary liberalisations and conservative backlashes occur in quick succession, or even concomitantly. Repression appears even within developments considered liberalising by contemporaries. The ambivalences within {\textquoteleft}progress{\textquoteright} and {\textquoteleft}change{\textquoteright} shape sexuality and its history. A third ambivalence is no less important – happiness. Despite being an act inextricably connected with pleasure, sex does not consistently give rise to happiness.",
author = "Victoria Harris",
year = "2013",
month = may,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S096077731300012X",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "295--301",
journal = "Contemporary European History",
issn = "0960-7773",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "02",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Histories of ‘Sex’, Histories of ‘Sexuality’

AU - Harris, Victoria

PY - 2013/5/1

Y1 - 2013/5/1

N2 - For Dagmar Herzog, writing the history of sexuality is an act of rebalancing. Sexuality becomes neither positive nor negative, but ambivalent. Herzog destabilises a dominant ‘narrative of gradual progress’, which misunderstands ‘how profoundly complicated the sexual politics of the twentieth century in Europe actually were’ (p. 2). Instead of a linear chronology, Herzog reveals a twentieth century of cyclical change – revolutionary liberalisations and conservative backlashes occur in quick succession, or even concomitantly. Repression appears even within developments considered liberalising by contemporaries. The ambivalences within ‘progress’ and ‘change’ shape sexuality and its history. A third ambivalence is no less important – happiness. Despite being an act inextricably connected with pleasure, sex does not consistently give rise to happiness.

AB - For Dagmar Herzog, writing the history of sexuality is an act of rebalancing. Sexuality becomes neither positive nor negative, but ambivalent. Herzog destabilises a dominant ‘narrative of gradual progress’, which misunderstands ‘how profoundly complicated the sexual politics of the twentieth century in Europe actually were’ (p. 2). Instead of a linear chronology, Herzog reveals a twentieth century of cyclical change – revolutionary liberalisations and conservative backlashes occur in quick succession, or even concomitantly. Repression appears even within developments considered liberalising by contemporaries. The ambivalences within ‘progress’ and ‘change’ shape sexuality and its history. A third ambivalence is no less important – happiness. Despite being an act inextricably connected with pleasure, sex does not consistently give rise to happiness.

U2 - 10.1017/S096077731300012X

DO - 10.1017/S096077731300012X

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 295

EP - 301

JO - Contemporary European History

JF - Contemporary European History

SN - 0960-7773

IS - 02

ER -