Haemodynamic reactions to acute psychological stress and smoking status in a large community sample

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{7171f79eae254fc0a454d65cad155cff,
title = "Haemodynamic reactions to acute psychological stress and smoking status in a large community sample",
abstract = "Exaggerated haemodynamic reactions to acute psychological stress have been implicated in a number of adverse health outcomes. This study examined, in a large community sample, the cross-sectional associations between haemodynamic reactivity and self-reported smoking status. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured at rest and in response to a 3-minute arithmetic stress task. Participants were classified as current, ex-, or non-smokers by their response to a simple prompt. Smokers had significantly smaller SBP and DBP reactions to acute stress than ex- and non-smokers; current and ex-smokers had lower HR reactivity. These effects remained significant following adjustment for a host of variables likely to be associated with reactivity and/or smoking. Although the act of smoking acutely increases haemodynamic activity, the present findings contribute to a growing body of literature showing that smokers have blunted reactivity to mental stress. They also support the hypothesis that blunted reactivity may be characteristic of a range of dependencies. The present results also suggest that smoking status needs to be considered in the design and analysis of stress reactivity studies.",
keywords = "Smoking, Heart rate, Cardiovascular reactivity, Acute psychological stress, Blood pressure",
author = "Anna Phillips and G Der and K Hunt and Douglas Carroll",
note = "MEDLINE{\textregistered} is the source for the MeSH terms of this document.",
year = "2009",
month = sep
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2009.04.005",
language = "English",
volume = "73",
pages = "273--278",
journal = "International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology",
issn = "0167-8760",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Haemodynamic reactions to acute psychological stress and smoking status in a large community sample

AU - Phillips, Anna

AU - Der, G

AU - Hunt, K

AU - Carroll, Douglas

N1 - MEDLINE® is the source for the MeSH terms of this document.

PY - 2009/9/1

Y1 - 2009/9/1

N2 - Exaggerated haemodynamic reactions to acute psychological stress have been implicated in a number of adverse health outcomes. This study examined, in a large community sample, the cross-sectional associations between haemodynamic reactivity and self-reported smoking status. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured at rest and in response to a 3-minute arithmetic stress task. Participants were classified as current, ex-, or non-smokers by their response to a simple prompt. Smokers had significantly smaller SBP and DBP reactions to acute stress than ex- and non-smokers; current and ex-smokers had lower HR reactivity. These effects remained significant following adjustment for a host of variables likely to be associated with reactivity and/or smoking. Although the act of smoking acutely increases haemodynamic activity, the present findings contribute to a growing body of literature showing that smokers have blunted reactivity to mental stress. They also support the hypothesis that blunted reactivity may be characteristic of a range of dependencies. The present results also suggest that smoking status needs to be considered in the design and analysis of stress reactivity studies.

AB - Exaggerated haemodynamic reactions to acute psychological stress have been implicated in a number of adverse health outcomes. This study examined, in a large community sample, the cross-sectional associations between haemodynamic reactivity and self-reported smoking status. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured at rest and in response to a 3-minute arithmetic stress task. Participants were classified as current, ex-, or non-smokers by their response to a simple prompt. Smokers had significantly smaller SBP and DBP reactions to acute stress than ex- and non-smokers; current and ex-smokers had lower HR reactivity. These effects remained significant following adjustment for a host of variables likely to be associated with reactivity and/or smoking. Although the act of smoking acutely increases haemodynamic activity, the present findings contribute to a growing body of literature showing that smokers have blunted reactivity to mental stress. They also support the hypothesis that blunted reactivity may be characteristic of a range of dependencies. The present results also suggest that smoking status needs to be considered in the design and analysis of stress reactivity studies.

KW - Smoking

KW - Heart rate

KW - Cardiovascular reactivity

KW - Acute psychological stress

KW - Blood pressure

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?partnerID=yv4JPVwI&eid=2-s2.0-67651067919&md5=7fcc022005e6d6e3ff35d561a7c0bbad

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2009.04.005

DO - 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2009.04.005

M3 - Article

C2 - 19397938

VL - 73

SP - 273

EP - 278

JO - International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology

JF - International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology

SN - 0167-8760

IS - 3

ER -