Gibberellins and Plant Reproduction

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Standard

Gibberellins and Plant Reproduction. / Plackett, Andrew R.G.; Wilson, Zoe A.

Annual Plant Reviews: The Gibberellins. Vol. 49 John Wiley & Sons, 2016. p. 323-358.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Harvard

Plackett, ARG & Wilson, ZA 2016, Gibberellins and Plant Reproduction. in Annual Plant Reviews: The Gibberellins. vol. 49, John Wiley & Sons, pp. 323-358. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119210436.ch11

APA

Plackett, A. R. G., & Wilson, Z. A. (2016). Gibberellins and Plant Reproduction. In Annual Plant Reviews: The Gibberellins (Vol. 49, pp. 323-358). John Wiley & Sons. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119210436.ch11

Vancouver

Plackett ARG, Wilson ZA. Gibberellins and Plant Reproduction. In Annual Plant Reviews: The Gibberellins. Vol. 49. John Wiley & Sons. 2016. p. 323-358 https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119210436.ch11

Author

Plackett, Andrew R.G. ; Wilson, Zoe A. / Gibberellins and Plant Reproduction. Annual Plant Reviews: The Gibberellins. Vol. 49 John Wiley & Sons, 2016. pp. 323-358

Bibtex

@inbook{78e30469fcfc418c96e8ee140420c867,
title = "Gibberellins and Plant Reproduction",
abstract = "The involvement of the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) in land plant reproductive processes is ancient, but is best understood in flowering plants (angiosperms). GA acts in angiosperms to promote the transition from vegetative to reproductive development, and subsequent development of both male (stamen) and female (pistil) floral organs. Coordinating growth between these organs to promote successful fertilisation is a key regulatory function of GA. Its functions in female development are not well understood, but in stamens a number of downstream regulatory pathways have been determined. GA signalling directly regulates processes both in pollen development and in the surrounding anther tissues, particularly the tapetum. Female fertility also requires GA, which, while incompletely understood, regulates both pistil and ovule development. GA is a crucial trigger of fruit development upon fertilisation, and subsequently contributes to both the development of viable seeds and of fruiting structures.",
keywords = "Fertility, Floral development, Floral transition, Fruit development, GA, Gibberellin, Ovule, Pollen, Reproduction, Seed development",
author = "Plackett, {Andrew R.G.} and Wilson, {Zoe A.}",
year = "2016",
month = apr
day = "14",
doi = "10.1002/9781119210436.ch11",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781119210429",
volume = "49",
pages = "323--358",
booktitle = "Annual Plant Reviews",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Gibberellins and Plant Reproduction

AU - Plackett, Andrew R.G.

AU - Wilson, Zoe A.

PY - 2016/4/14

Y1 - 2016/4/14

N2 - The involvement of the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) in land plant reproductive processes is ancient, but is best understood in flowering plants (angiosperms). GA acts in angiosperms to promote the transition from vegetative to reproductive development, and subsequent development of both male (stamen) and female (pistil) floral organs. Coordinating growth between these organs to promote successful fertilisation is a key regulatory function of GA. Its functions in female development are not well understood, but in stamens a number of downstream regulatory pathways have been determined. GA signalling directly regulates processes both in pollen development and in the surrounding anther tissues, particularly the tapetum. Female fertility also requires GA, which, while incompletely understood, regulates both pistil and ovule development. GA is a crucial trigger of fruit development upon fertilisation, and subsequently contributes to both the development of viable seeds and of fruiting structures.

AB - The involvement of the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) in land plant reproductive processes is ancient, but is best understood in flowering plants (angiosperms). GA acts in angiosperms to promote the transition from vegetative to reproductive development, and subsequent development of both male (stamen) and female (pistil) floral organs. Coordinating growth between these organs to promote successful fertilisation is a key regulatory function of GA. Its functions in female development are not well understood, but in stamens a number of downstream regulatory pathways have been determined. GA signalling directly regulates processes both in pollen development and in the surrounding anther tissues, particularly the tapetum. Female fertility also requires GA, which, while incompletely understood, regulates both pistil and ovule development. GA is a crucial trigger of fruit development upon fertilisation, and subsequently contributes to both the development of viable seeds and of fruiting structures.

KW - Fertility

KW - Floral development

KW - Floral transition

KW - Fruit development

KW - GA

KW - Gibberellin

KW - Ovule

KW - Pollen

KW - Reproduction

KW - Seed development

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85030684398&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/9781119210436.ch11

DO - 10.1002/9781119210436.ch11

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:85030684398

SN - 9781119210429

VL - 49

SP - 323

EP - 358

BT - Annual Plant Reviews

PB - John Wiley & Sons

ER -