Geographic components of SARS-CoV-2 expansion: a hypothesis

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Geographic components of SARS-CoV-2 expansion : a hypothesis. / Joyce, Kelsey E; Weaver, Samuel R; Lucas, Samuel J E.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, 23.07.2020.

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@article{4280ac56b9ad440cb7ff141f5645750d,
title = "Geographic components of SARS-CoV-2 expansion: a hypothesis",
abstract = "The emergence of COVID-19 infection (caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus) in Wuhan, China in the latter part of 2019 has, within a relatively short time, led to a global pandemic. Amidst the initial spread of SARS-CoV-2 across Asia, an epidemiologic trend emerged in relation to high altitude (HA) populations. Compared to the rest of Asia, SARS-CoV-2 exhibited attenuated rates of expansion with limited COVID-19 infection severity along the Tibetan plateau. These characteristics were soon evident in additional HA regions across Bolivia, central Ecuador, Nepal, Bhutan, and the Sichuan province of mainland China. This mini-review presents a discussion surrounding attributes of the HA environment, aspects of HA physiology, as well as, genetic variations among HA populations which may provide clues for this pattern of SARS-CoV-2 expansion and COVID-19 infection severity. Explanations are provided in the hypothetical, albeit relevant historical evidence is provided to create a foundation for future research.",
author = "Joyce, {Kelsey E} and Weaver, {Samuel R} and Lucas, {Samuel J E}",
year = "2020",
month = jul,
day = "23",
doi = "10.1152/japplphysiol.00362.2020",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Applied Physiology",
issn = "8750-7587",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Geographic components of SARS-CoV-2 expansion

T2 - a hypothesis

AU - Joyce, Kelsey E

AU - Weaver, Samuel R

AU - Lucas, Samuel J E

PY - 2020/7/23

Y1 - 2020/7/23

N2 - The emergence of COVID-19 infection (caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus) in Wuhan, China in the latter part of 2019 has, within a relatively short time, led to a global pandemic. Amidst the initial spread of SARS-CoV-2 across Asia, an epidemiologic trend emerged in relation to high altitude (HA) populations. Compared to the rest of Asia, SARS-CoV-2 exhibited attenuated rates of expansion with limited COVID-19 infection severity along the Tibetan plateau. These characteristics were soon evident in additional HA regions across Bolivia, central Ecuador, Nepal, Bhutan, and the Sichuan province of mainland China. This mini-review presents a discussion surrounding attributes of the HA environment, aspects of HA physiology, as well as, genetic variations among HA populations which may provide clues for this pattern of SARS-CoV-2 expansion and COVID-19 infection severity. Explanations are provided in the hypothetical, albeit relevant historical evidence is provided to create a foundation for future research.

AB - The emergence of COVID-19 infection (caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus) in Wuhan, China in the latter part of 2019 has, within a relatively short time, led to a global pandemic. Amidst the initial spread of SARS-CoV-2 across Asia, an epidemiologic trend emerged in relation to high altitude (HA) populations. Compared to the rest of Asia, SARS-CoV-2 exhibited attenuated rates of expansion with limited COVID-19 infection severity along the Tibetan plateau. These characteristics were soon evident in additional HA regions across Bolivia, central Ecuador, Nepal, Bhutan, and the Sichuan province of mainland China. This mini-review presents a discussion surrounding attributes of the HA environment, aspects of HA physiology, as well as, genetic variations among HA populations which may provide clues for this pattern of SARS-CoV-2 expansion and COVID-19 infection severity. Explanations are provided in the hypothetical, albeit relevant historical evidence is provided to create a foundation for future research.

U2 - 10.1152/japplphysiol.00362.2020

DO - 10.1152/japplphysiol.00362.2020

M3 - Article

C2 - 32702272

JO - Journal of Applied Physiology

JF - Journal of Applied Physiology

SN - 8750-7587

ER -