Gender and refugee integration: a quantitative analysis of integration and social policy outcomes

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Gender and refugee integration : a quantitative analysis of integration and social policy outcomes. / Cheung, Sin Yi; Phillimore, Jennifer.

In: Journal of Social Policy, Vol. 46, No. 2, 04.2017, p. 211 - 230.

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@article{28c205439c5941feab009e496dc309e6,
title = "Gender and refugee integration: a quantitative analysis of integration and social policy outcomes",
abstract = "The population of refugees in the UK is expanding and will expand further given the UK Government{\textquoteright}s response to the European refugee crisis. This paper breaks new ground by undertaking a gender analysis of integration outcomes across a range of areas, namely social networks, language proficiency, health, education and employment, and housing, that are highly relevant for social policy. Using the UK{\textquoteright}s only longitudinal survey data on refugees, we conduct secondary data analysis to examine the factors associated with integration outcomes. We find significant gender differences in access to formal social networks, language, self-reported health, ability to budget for household expenses and access to quality housing with women generally faring worse than men and some inequalities enduring or intensifying over time. We call for the recording of refugee outcomes in institutional monitoring data to enable inequalities to be identified and addressed. The findings also enable the identification of social policy areas in which a gender sensitive approach might be necessary. ",
keywords = "refugees, integration , social network , gender, social policy",
author = "Cheung, {Sin Yi} and Jennifer Phillimore",
year = "2017",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1017/S0047279416000775",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "211 -- 230",
journal = "Journal of Social Policy",
issn = "0047-2794",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gender and refugee integration

T2 - a quantitative analysis of integration and social policy outcomes

AU - Cheung, Sin Yi

AU - Phillimore, Jennifer

PY - 2017/4

Y1 - 2017/4

N2 - The population of refugees in the UK is expanding and will expand further given the UK Government’s response to the European refugee crisis. This paper breaks new ground by undertaking a gender analysis of integration outcomes across a range of areas, namely social networks, language proficiency, health, education and employment, and housing, that are highly relevant for social policy. Using the UK’s only longitudinal survey data on refugees, we conduct secondary data analysis to examine the factors associated with integration outcomes. We find significant gender differences in access to formal social networks, language, self-reported health, ability to budget for household expenses and access to quality housing with women generally faring worse than men and some inequalities enduring or intensifying over time. We call for the recording of refugee outcomes in institutional monitoring data to enable inequalities to be identified and addressed. The findings also enable the identification of social policy areas in which a gender sensitive approach might be necessary.

AB - The population of refugees in the UK is expanding and will expand further given the UK Government’s response to the European refugee crisis. This paper breaks new ground by undertaking a gender analysis of integration outcomes across a range of areas, namely social networks, language proficiency, health, education and employment, and housing, that are highly relevant for social policy. Using the UK’s only longitudinal survey data on refugees, we conduct secondary data analysis to examine the factors associated with integration outcomes. We find significant gender differences in access to formal social networks, language, self-reported health, ability to budget for household expenses and access to quality housing with women generally faring worse than men and some inequalities enduring or intensifying over time. We call for the recording of refugee outcomes in institutional monitoring data to enable inequalities to be identified and addressed. The findings also enable the identification of social policy areas in which a gender sensitive approach might be necessary.

KW - refugees

KW - integration

KW - social network

KW - gender

KW - social policy

U2 - 10.1017/S0047279416000775

DO - 10.1017/S0047279416000775

M3 - Article

VL - 46

SP - 211

EP - 230

JO - Journal of Social Policy

JF - Journal of Social Policy

SN - 0047-2794

IS - 2

ER -