From The Origin of Species to the origin of bacterial flagella

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From The Origin of Species to the origin of bacterial flagella. / Pallen, Mark; Matzke, NJ.

In: Nature Reviews Microbiology, Vol. 4, No. 10, 01.01.2006, p. 784-790.

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@article{03df56914c604dbfb8cbcadbe2a564ee,
title = "From The Origin of Species to the origin of bacterial flagella",
abstract = "In the recent Dover trial, and elsewhere, the 'Intelligent Design' movement has championed the bacterial flagellum as an irreducibly complex system that, it is claimed, could not have evolved through natural selection. Here we explore the arguments in favour of viewing bacterial flagella as evolved, rather than designed, entities. We dismiss the need for any great conceptual leaps in creating a model of flagellar evolution and speculate as to how an experimental programme focused on this topic might look.",
author = "Mark Pallen and NJ Matzke",
year = "2006",
month = jan,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/nrmicro1493",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "784--790",
journal = "Nature Reviews Microbiology",
issn = "1740-1526",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - From The Origin of Species to the origin of bacterial flagella

AU - Pallen, Mark

AU - Matzke, NJ

PY - 2006/1/1

Y1 - 2006/1/1

N2 - In the recent Dover trial, and elsewhere, the 'Intelligent Design' movement has championed the bacterial flagellum as an irreducibly complex system that, it is claimed, could not have evolved through natural selection. Here we explore the arguments in favour of viewing bacterial flagella as evolved, rather than designed, entities. We dismiss the need for any great conceptual leaps in creating a model of flagellar evolution and speculate as to how an experimental programme focused on this topic might look.

AB - In the recent Dover trial, and elsewhere, the 'Intelligent Design' movement has championed the bacterial flagellum as an irreducibly complex system that, it is claimed, could not have evolved through natural selection. Here we explore the arguments in favour of viewing bacterial flagella as evolved, rather than designed, entities. We dismiss the need for any great conceptual leaps in creating a model of flagellar evolution and speculate as to how an experimental programme focused on this topic might look.

U2 - 10.1038/nrmicro1493

DO - 10.1038/nrmicro1493

M3 - Article

C2 - 16953248

VL - 4

SP - 784

EP - 790

JO - Nature Reviews Microbiology

JF - Nature Reviews Microbiology

SN - 1740-1526

IS - 10

ER -