From self sufficiency to dependence: mechanisms and factors important for autotransporter biogenesis

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From self sufficiency to dependence: mechanisms and factors important for autotransporter biogenesis. / Leyton, DL; Rossiter, Amanda; Henderson, Ian.

In: Nature Reviews Microbiology, Vol. 10, No. 3, 01.03.2012, p. 213-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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@article{a0106c4032324f70965611fc88ca1bfd,
title = "From self sufficiency to dependence: mechanisms and factors important for autotransporter biogenesis",
abstract = "Autotransporters are a superfamily of proteins that use the type V secretion pathway for their delivery to the surface of Gram-negative bacteria. At first glance, autotransporters look to contain all the functional elements required to promote their own secretion: an amino-terminal signal peptide to mediate translocation across the inner membrane, a central passenger domain that is the secreted functional moiety, and a channel-forming carboxyl terminus that facilitates passenger domain translocation across the outer membrane. However, recent discoveries of common structural themes, translocation intermediates and accessory interactions have challenged the perceived simplicity of autotransporter secretion. Here, we discuss how these studies have led to an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for autotransporter biogenesis.",
author = "DL Leyton and Amanda Rossiter and Ian Henderson",
year = "2012",
month = mar
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/nrmicro2733",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "213--225",
journal = "Nature Reviews Microbiology",
issn = "1740-1526",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - From self sufficiency to dependence: mechanisms and factors important for autotransporter biogenesis

AU - Leyton, DL

AU - Rossiter, Amanda

AU - Henderson, Ian

PY - 2012/3/1

Y1 - 2012/3/1

N2 - Autotransporters are a superfamily of proteins that use the type V secretion pathway for their delivery to the surface of Gram-negative bacteria. At first glance, autotransporters look to contain all the functional elements required to promote their own secretion: an amino-terminal signal peptide to mediate translocation across the inner membrane, a central passenger domain that is the secreted functional moiety, and a channel-forming carboxyl terminus that facilitates passenger domain translocation across the outer membrane. However, recent discoveries of common structural themes, translocation intermediates and accessory interactions have challenged the perceived simplicity of autotransporter secretion. Here, we discuss how these studies have led to an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for autotransporter biogenesis.

AB - Autotransporters are a superfamily of proteins that use the type V secretion pathway for their delivery to the surface of Gram-negative bacteria. At first glance, autotransporters look to contain all the functional elements required to promote their own secretion: an amino-terminal signal peptide to mediate translocation across the inner membrane, a central passenger domain that is the secreted functional moiety, and a channel-forming carboxyl terminus that facilitates passenger domain translocation across the outer membrane. However, recent discoveries of common structural themes, translocation intermediates and accessory interactions have challenged the perceived simplicity of autotransporter secretion. Here, we discuss how these studies have led to an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for autotransporter biogenesis.

U2 - 10.1038/nrmicro2733

DO - 10.1038/nrmicro2733

M3 - Review article

C2 - 22337167

VL - 10

SP - 213

EP - 225

JO - Nature Reviews Microbiology

JF - Nature Reviews Microbiology

SN - 1740-1526

IS - 3

ER -