Formation of the black-hole binary M33 X-7 through mass exchange in a tight massive system

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Formation of the black-hole binary M33 X-7 through mass exchange in a tight massive system. / Valsecchi, F.; Farr, W.M.; Fragos, T.; Willems, B.; Kalogera, V.; Glebbeek, E.; Orosz, J.A.; Liu, J.

In: Nature, Vol. 468, No. 7320, 04.11.2010, p. 77-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Valsecchi, F, Farr, WM, Fragos, T, Willems, B, Kalogera, V, Glebbeek, E, Orosz, JA & Liu, J 2010, 'Formation of the black-hole binary M33 X-7 through mass exchange in a tight massive system', Nature, vol. 468, no. 7320, pp. 77-79. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature09463

APA

Valsecchi, F., Farr, W. M., Fragos, T., Willems, B., Kalogera, V., Glebbeek, E., Orosz, J. A., & Liu, J. (2010). Formation of the black-hole binary M33 X-7 through mass exchange in a tight massive system. Nature, 468(7320), 77-79. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature09463

Vancouver

Valsecchi F, Farr WM, Fragos T, Willems B, Kalogera V, Glebbeek E et al. Formation of the black-hole binary M33 X-7 through mass exchange in a tight massive system. Nature. 2010 Nov 4;468(7320):77-79. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature09463

Author

Valsecchi, F. ; Farr, W.M. ; Fragos, T. ; Willems, B. ; Kalogera, V. ; Glebbeek, E. ; Orosz, J.A. ; Liu, J. / Formation of the black-hole binary M33 X-7 through mass exchange in a tight massive system. In: Nature. 2010 ; Vol. 468, No. 7320. pp. 77-79.

Bibtex

@article{d4df75f03c274eb9b32e69b679d55cbb,
title = "Formation of the black-hole binary M33 X-7 through mass exchange in a tight massive system",
abstract = "The X-ray source M33 X-7 in the nearby galaxy Messier 33 is among the most massive X-ray binary stellar systems known, hosting a rapidly spinning, 15.65M {\texttrademark} black hole orbiting an underluminous, 70M {\texttrademark} main-sequence companion in a slightly eccentric 3.45-day orbit (M {\texttrademark}, solar mass). Although post-main-sequence mass transfer explains the masses and tight orbit, it leaves unexplained the observed X-ray luminosity, the star's underluminosity, the black hole's spin and the orbital eccentricity. A common envelope phase, or rotational mixing, could explain the orbit, but the former would lead to a merger and the latter to an overluminous companion. A merger would also ensue if mass transfer to the black hole were invoked for its spin-up. Here we report simulations of evolutionary tracks which reveal that if M33 X-7 started as a primary body of 85M {\texttrademark} 99M {\texttrademark} and a secondary body of 28M {\texttrademark} 32M {\texttrademark}, in a 2.8 3.1-d orbit, its observed properties can be consistently explained. In this model, the main-sequence primary transfers part of its envelope to the secondary and loses the rest in a wind; it ends its life as a 1/416M {\texttrademark} helium star with an irong-nickel core that collapses to a black hole (with or without an accompanying supernova). The release of binding energy, and possibly collapse asymmetries, kickg {\texttrademark} the nascent black hole into an eccentric orbit. Wind accretion explains the X-ray luminosity, and the black-hole spin can be natal.",
author = "F. Valsecchi and W.M. Farr and T. Fragos and B. Willems and V. Kalogera and E. Glebbeek and J.A. Orosz and J. Liu",
year = "2010",
month = nov,
day = "4",
doi = "10.1038/nature09463",
language = "English",
volume = "468",
pages = "77--79",
journal = "Nature",
issn = "0028-0836",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "7320",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Formation of the black-hole binary M33 X-7 through mass exchange in a tight massive system

AU - Valsecchi, F.

AU - Farr, W.M.

AU - Fragos, T.

AU - Willems, B.

AU - Kalogera, V.

AU - Glebbeek, E.

AU - Orosz, J.A.

AU - Liu, J.

PY - 2010/11/4

Y1 - 2010/11/4

N2 - The X-ray source M33 X-7 in the nearby galaxy Messier 33 is among the most massive X-ray binary stellar systems known, hosting a rapidly spinning, 15.65M ™ black hole orbiting an underluminous, 70M ™ main-sequence companion in a slightly eccentric 3.45-day orbit (M ™, solar mass). Although post-main-sequence mass transfer explains the masses and tight orbit, it leaves unexplained the observed X-ray luminosity, the star's underluminosity, the black hole's spin and the orbital eccentricity. A common envelope phase, or rotational mixing, could explain the orbit, but the former would lead to a merger and the latter to an overluminous companion. A merger would also ensue if mass transfer to the black hole were invoked for its spin-up. Here we report simulations of evolutionary tracks which reveal that if M33 X-7 started as a primary body of 85M ™ 99M ™ and a secondary body of 28M ™ 32M ™, in a 2.8 3.1-d orbit, its observed properties can be consistently explained. In this model, the main-sequence primary transfers part of its envelope to the secondary and loses the rest in a wind; it ends its life as a 1/416M ™ helium star with an irong-nickel core that collapses to a black hole (with or without an accompanying supernova). The release of binding energy, and possibly collapse asymmetries, kickg ™ the nascent black hole into an eccentric orbit. Wind accretion explains the X-ray luminosity, and the black-hole spin can be natal.

AB - The X-ray source M33 X-7 in the nearby galaxy Messier 33 is among the most massive X-ray binary stellar systems known, hosting a rapidly spinning, 15.65M ™ black hole orbiting an underluminous, 70M ™ main-sequence companion in a slightly eccentric 3.45-day orbit (M ™, solar mass). Although post-main-sequence mass transfer explains the masses and tight orbit, it leaves unexplained the observed X-ray luminosity, the star's underluminosity, the black hole's spin and the orbital eccentricity. A common envelope phase, or rotational mixing, could explain the orbit, but the former would lead to a merger and the latter to an overluminous companion. A merger would also ensue if mass transfer to the black hole were invoked for its spin-up. Here we report simulations of evolutionary tracks which reveal that if M33 X-7 started as a primary body of 85M ™ 99M ™ and a secondary body of 28M ™ 32M ™, in a 2.8 3.1-d orbit, its observed properties can be consistently explained. In this model, the main-sequence primary transfers part of its envelope to the secondary and loses the rest in a wind; it ends its life as a 1/416M ™ helium star with an irong-nickel core that collapses to a black hole (with or without an accompanying supernova). The release of binding energy, and possibly collapse asymmetries, kickg ™ the nascent black hole into an eccentric orbit. Wind accretion explains the X-ray luminosity, and the black-hole spin can be natal.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-78149285833&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/nature09463

DO - 10.1038/nature09463

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:78149285833

VL - 468

SP - 77

EP - 79

JO - Nature

JF - Nature

SN - 0028-0836

IS - 7320

ER -