Fetal growth and length of gestation in relation to prenatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke assessed by hair nicotine concentration

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@article{6bc25e874c9a467a909dc85d41d3b0d9,
title = "Fetal growth and length of gestation in relation to prenatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke assessed by hair nicotine concentration",
abstract = "We assessed the effects of prenatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke on fetal growth and length of gestation. The study population consisted of 389 nonsmoking women who were selected from a population-based study in southeast Finland on the basis of questionnaire information after delivery (response rate 94%). The final exposure assessment was based on nicotine concentration of maternal hair sampled after the delivery, which measures exposure during the past 2 months (i.e., the third trimester). The exposure categories were defined a priori as high (nicotine concentration [Greater and equal to] 4.00 microg/g; n = 52), medium (0.75 to <4.00 microg/g; n = 186), and low as the reference category (<0.75 microg/g; n = 151). In logistic regression analysis, controlling for confounding, the risk of preterm delivery (<37 weeks) was higher in the high [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 6.12; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.31-28.7] and medium exposure categories (adjusted OR = 1.30; 95% CI, 0.30-5.58) compared with the reference category, and there was a 1.22 (95% CI, 1.07-1.39) increase in adjusted OR with a 1 microg/g increase in hair nicotine concentration. The corresponding adjusted OR was 1.06 (95% CI, 0.96-1.17) for low birth weight and 1.04 (95% CI, 0.92-1.19) for small-for-gestational-age.",
author = "Jouni Jaakkola and N Jaakkola and K Zahlsen",
year = "2001",
month = jun,
day = "1",
doi = "10.2307/3455027",
language = "English",
volume = "109",
pages = "557--561",
journal = "Environmental Health Perspectives",
issn = "0091-6765",
publisher = "National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fetal growth and length of gestation in relation to prenatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke assessed by hair nicotine concentration

AU - Jaakkola, Jouni

AU - Jaakkola, N

AU - Zahlsen, K

PY - 2001/6/1

Y1 - 2001/6/1

N2 - We assessed the effects of prenatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke on fetal growth and length of gestation. The study population consisted of 389 nonsmoking women who were selected from a population-based study in southeast Finland on the basis of questionnaire information after delivery (response rate 94%). The final exposure assessment was based on nicotine concentration of maternal hair sampled after the delivery, which measures exposure during the past 2 months (i.e., the third trimester). The exposure categories were defined a priori as high (nicotine concentration [Greater and equal to] 4.00 microg/g; n = 52), medium (0.75 to <4.00 microg/g; n = 186), and low as the reference category (<0.75 microg/g; n = 151). In logistic regression analysis, controlling for confounding, the risk of preterm delivery (<37 weeks) was higher in the high [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 6.12; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.31-28.7] and medium exposure categories (adjusted OR = 1.30; 95% CI, 0.30-5.58) compared with the reference category, and there was a 1.22 (95% CI, 1.07-1.39) increase in adjusted OR with a 1 microg/g increase in hair nicotine concentration. The corresponding adjusted OR was 1.06 (95% CI, 0.96-1.17) for low birth weight and 1.04 (95% CI, 0.92-1.19) for small-for-gestational-age.

AB - We assessed the effects of prenatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke on fetal growth and length of gestation. The study population consisted of 389 nonsmoking women who were selected from a population-based study in southeast Finland on the basis of questionnaire information after delivery (response rate 94%). The final exposure assessment was based on nicotine concentration of maternal hair sampled after the delivery, which measures exposure during the past 2 months (i.e., the third trimester). The exposure categories were defined a priori as high (nicotine concentration [Greater and equal to] 4.00 microg/g; n = 52), medium (0.75 to <4.00 microg/g; n = 186), and low as the reference category (<0.75 microg/g; n = 151). In logistic regression analysis, controlling for confounding, the risk of preterm delivery (<37 weeks) was higher in the high [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 6.12; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.31-28.7] and medium exposure categories (adjusted OR = 1.30; 95% CI, 0.30-5.58) compared with the reference category, and there was a 1.22 (95% CI, 1.07-1.39) increase in adjusted OR with a 1 microg/g increase in hair nicotine concentration. The corresponding adjusted OR was 1.06 (95% CI, 0.96-1.17) for low birth weight and 1.04 (95% CI, 0.92-1.19) for small-for-gestational-age.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035354886&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2307/3455027

DO - 10.2307/3455027

M3 - Article

C2 - 11445507

VL - 109

SP - 557

EP - 561

JO - Environmental Health Perspectives

JF - Environmental Health Perspectives

SN - 0091-6765

ER -