Feasibility Trial Evaluation of a Peer Volunteering Active Aging Intervention: ACE (Active, Connected, Engaged)

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Feasibility Trial Evaluation of a Peer Volunteering Active Aging Intervention : ACE (Active, Connected, Engaged). / Stathi, Afroditi; Withall, Janet; Thompson, Janice L; Davis, Mark G; Gray, Selena; De Koning, Jolanthe; Parkhurst, Graham; Lloyd, Liz; Greaves, Colin; Laventure, Robert; Fox, Kenneth R.

In: The Gerontologist, 19.02.2019.

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Stathi, Afroditi ; Withall, Janet ; Thompson, Janice L ; Davis, Mark G ; Gray, Selena ; De Koning, Jolanthe ; Parkhurst, Graham ; Lloyd, Liz ; Greaves, Colin ; Laventure, Robert ; Fox, Kenneth R. / Feasibility Trial Evaluation of a Peer Volunteering Active Aging Intervention : ACE (Active, Connected, Engaged). In: The Gerontologist. 2019.

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@article{24e3aae02353490e85c7b74e546138d5,
title = "Feasibility Trial Evaluation of a Peer Volunteering Active Aging Intervention: ACE (Active, Connected, Engaged)",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: ACE (Active, Connected, Engaged) is a theory-informed, pragmatic intervention using peer volunteering support to promote active ageing in socially disengaged, inactive older adults. This study aimed to establish ACE's feasibility and acceptability.METHODS: Fifty-four older adults were recruited as either peer volunteers (activators; n = 15) or participants (ACEs; n = 39). Participants were randomized to one-to-one support from an activator (ACEs-Intervention [ACEs-I]) or a waiting-list control group (ACEs-Control [ACEs-C]). Activators supported ACEs-I to get out more and engage with local activities. Objectively measured physical activity (PA), lower limb function, and number of out of house activities were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. A mixed-methods process evaluation assessed changes in confidence to get out and about, social support, autonomy, competence, and relatedness.RESULTS: Eighty-two percent of ACEs (mean age = 73.7 years [SD 7.3]) and all activators completed assessments at both baseline and post-intervention (6 months). ACEs-I reported more out of house activities (M [SD] = 6.34 [4.15]). ACEs-I increased physical function post-intervention (M [SD] = 9.8 [2.3]). ACEs-I reported improved well-being and vitality and increased confidence to get out and about, confidence in the face of specific barriers, knowledge of local initiatives, and perceived social support post-intervention. Activators, although sufficiently active at baseline, increased their PA further. ACE was well-accepted and easy to deliver.CONCLUSIONS: ACE is an acceptable and feasible intervention for helping socially disengaged older people to get out and about more, improve their confidence, and engage more with their community.",
author = "Afroditi Stathi and Janet Withall and Thompson, {Janice L} and Davis, {Mark G} and Selena Gray and {De Koning}, Jolanthe and Graham Parkhurst and Liz Lloyd and Colin Greaves and Robert Laventure and Fox, {Kenneth R}",
note = "{\textcopyright} The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.",
year = "2019",
month = feb,
day = "19",
doi = "10.1093/geront/gnz003",
language = "English",
journal = "The Gerontologist",
issn = "0016-9013",
publisher = "SIPRI/Oxford University Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Feasibility Trial Evaluation of a Peer Volunteering Active Aging Intervention

T2 - ACE (Active, Connected, Engaged)

AU - Stathi, Afroditi

AU - Withall, Janet

AU - Thompson, Janice L

AU - Davis, Mark G

AU - Gray, Selena

AU - De Koning, Jolanthe

AU - Parkhurst, Graham

AU - Lloyd, Liz

AU - Greaves, Colin

AU - Laventure, Robert

AU - Fox, Kenneth R

N1 - © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2019/2/19

Y1 - 2019/2/19

N2 - BACKGROUND: ACE (Active, Connected, Engaged) is a theory-informed, pragmatic intervention using peer volunteering support to promote active ageing in socially disengaged, inactive older adults. This study aimed to establish ACE's feasibility and acceptability.METHODS: Fifty-four older adults were recruited as either peer volunteers (activators; n = 15) or participants (ACEs; n = 39). Participants were randomized to one-to-one support from an activator (ACEs-Intervention [ACEs-I]) or a waiting-list control group (ACEs-Control [ACEs-C]). Activators supported ACEs-I to get out more and engage with local activities. Objectively measured physical activity (PA), lower limb function, and number of out of house activities were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. A mixed-methods process evaluation assessed changes in confidence to get out and about, social support, autonomy, competence, and relatedness.RESULTS: Eighty-two percent of ACEs (mean age = 73.7 years [SD 7.3]) and all activators completed assessments at both baseline and post-intervention (6 months). ACEs-I reported more out of house activities (M [SD] = 6.34 [4.15]). ACEs-I increased physical function post-intervention (M [SD] = 9.8 [2.3]). ACEs-I reported improved well-being and vitality and increased confidence to get out and about, confidence in the face of specific barriers, knowledge of local initiatives, and perceived social support post-intervention. Activators, although sufficiently active at baseline, increased their PA further. ACE was well-accepted and easy to deliver.CONCLUSIONS: ACE is an acceptable and feasible intervention for helping socially disengaged older people to get out and about more, improve their confidence, and engage more with their community.

AB - BACKGROUND: ACE (Active, Connected, Engaged) is a theory-informed, pragmatic intervention using peer volunteering support to promote active ageing in socially disengaged, inactive older adults. This study aimed to establish ACE's feasibility and acceptability.METHODS: Fifty-four older adults were recruited as either peer volunteers (activators; n = 15) or participants (ACEs; n = 39). Participants were randomized to one-to-one support from an activator (ACEs-Intervention [ACEs-I]) or a waiting-list control group (ACEs-Control [ACEs-C]). Activators supported ACEs-I to get out more and engage with local activities. Objectively measured physical activity (PA), lower limb function, and number of out of house activities were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. A mixed-methods process evaluation assessed changes in confidence to get out and about, social support, autonomy, competence, and relatedness.RESULTS: Eighty-two percent of ACEs (mean age = 73.7 years [SD 7.3]) and all activators completed assessments at both baseline and post-intervention (6 months). ACEs-I reported more out of house activities (M [SD] = 6.34 [4.15]). ACEs-I increased physical function post-intervention (M [SD] = 9.8 [2.3]). ACEs-I reported improved well-being and vitality and increased confidence to get out and about, confidence in the face of specific barriers, knowledge of local initiatives, and perceived social support post-intervention. Activators, although sufficiently active at baseline, increased their PA further. ACE was well-accepted and easy to deliver.CONCLUSIONS: ACE is an acceptable and feasible intervention for helping socially disengaged older people to get out and about more, improve their confidence, and engage more with their community.

U2 - 10.1093/geront/gnz003

DO - 10.1093/geront/gnz003

M3 - Article

C2 - 30779849

JO - The Gerontologist

JF - The Gerontologist

SN - 0016-9013

ER -