Feasibility and preliminary effects of a peer-led motivationally-embellished workplace walking intervention: a pilot cluster randomized trial (the START trial)

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Feasibility and preliminary effects of a peer-led motivationally-embellished workplace walking intervention : a pilot cluster randomized trial (the START trial). / Thøgersen-ntoumani, C.; Quested, E.; Smith, B. S.; Nicholas, J.; Mcveigh, J.; Fenton, S. A. M.; Stamatakis, E.; Parker, S.; Pereira, G.; Gucciardi, D. F.; Ntoumanis, N.

In: Contemporary Clinical Trials, Vol. 91, 105969, 04.2020.

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@article{0850cbf5222441ecae6165f614f75b1c,
title = "Feasibility and preliminary effects of a peer-led motivationally-embellished workplace walking intervention: a pilot cluster randomized trial (the START trial)",
abstract = "Walking interventions can be effective in increasing physical activity amongst physically inactive employees. However, despite their promising potential regarding sustainability and scalability, peer-led workplace walking interventions have not been tested. We evaluated a peer-led workplace group walking intervention designed to engage physically inactive employees. A 16-week pilot cluster randomized controlled trial consisted of enhanced (5 worksites; n = 50 participants) and minimal treatment (3 worksites; n = 47) conditions. All participants were provided with a Fitbit Zip and information on health benefits of walking. Enhanced treatment participants had access to a mobile phone app incorporating behavior change techniques, were trained on principles of autonomous motivation, and had a peer leader trained in a motivationally supportive communication style. Feasibility assessments included recruitment and drop-out rates, assessment completion rates, training acceptability (walkers and peer leaders), and intervention acceptability (walkers only). Outcomes assessed included movement-related behaviors (assessed via activPAL devices), cardio-metabolic risk factors, motivation to walk, and well-being, and these measures were taken at baseline and post-intervention. The results supported intervention feasibility. Preliminary efficacy evidence was mixed. Markers of cardio-metabolic risk improved in the enhanced treatment only. Autonomous motivation increased in both conditions. There were no changes in step counts, standing, and sitting time, or well-being. Further fine tuning is needed before a definitive RCT.Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12618000807257.",
keywords = "peer leader, motivational training, self-determination theory, physical activity",
author = "C. Th{\o}gersen-ntoumani and E. Quested and Smith, {B. S.} and J. Nicholas and J. Mcveigh and Fenton, {S. A. M.} and E. Stamatakis and S. Parker and G. Pereira and Gucciardi, {D. F.} and N. Ntoumanis",
year = "2020",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1016/j.cct.2020.105969",
language = "English",
volume = "91",
journal = "Contemporary Clinical Trials",
issn = "1551-7144",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Feasibility and preliminary effects of a peer-led motivationally-embellished workplace walking intervention

T2 - a pilot cluster randomized trial (the START trial)

AU - Thøgersen-ntoumani, C.

AU - Quested, E.

AU - Smith, B. S.

AU - Nicholas, J.

AU - Mcveigh, J.

AU - Fenton, S. A. M.

AU - Stamatakis, E.

AU - Parker, S.

AU - Pereira, G.

AU - Gucciardi, D. F.

AU - Ntoumanis, N.

PY - 2020/4

Y1 - 2020/4

N2 - Walking interventions can be effective in increasing physical activity amongst physically inactive employees. However, despite their promising potential regarding sustainability and scalability, peer-led workplace walking interventions have not been tested. We evaluated a peer-led workplace group walking intervention designed to engage physically inactive employees. A 16-week pilot cluster randomized controlled trial consisted of enhanced (5 worksites; n = 50 participants) and minimal treatment (3 worksites; n = 47) conditions. All participants were provided with a Fitbit Zip and information on health benefits of walking. Enhanced treatment participants had access to a mobile phone app incorporating behavior change techniques, were trained on principles of autonomous motivation, and had a peer leader trained in a motivationally supportive communication style. Feasibility assessments included recruitment and drop-out rates, assessment completion rates, training acceptability (walkers and peer leaders), and intervention acceptability (walkers only). Outcomes assessed included movement-related behaviors (assessed via activPAL devices), cardio-metabolic risk factors, motivation to walk, and well-being, and these measures were taken at baseline and post-intervention. The results supported intervention feasibility. Preliminary efficacy evidence was mixed. Markers of cardio-metabolic risk improved in the enhanced treatment only. Autonomous motivation increased in both conditions. There were no changes in step counts, standing, and sitting time, or well-being. Further fine tuning is needed before a definitive RCT.Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12618000807257.

AB - Walking interventions can be effective in increasing physical activity amongst physically inactive employees. However, despite their promising potential regarding sustainability and scalability, peer-led workplace walking interventions have not been tested. We evaluated a peer-led workplace group walking intervention designed to engage physically inactive employees. A 16-week pilot cluster randomized controlled trial consisted of enhanced (5 worksites; n = 50 participants) and minimal treatment (3 worksites; n = 47) conditions. All participants were provided with a Fitbit Zip and information on health benefits of walking. Enhanced treatment participants had access to a mobile phone app incorporating behavior change techniques, were trained on principles of autonomous motivation, and had a peer leader trained in a motivationally supportive communication style. Feasibility assessments included recruitment and drop-out rates, assessment completion rates, training acceptability (walkers and peer leaders), and intervention acceptability (walkers only). Outcomes assessed included movement-related behaviors (assessed via activPAL devices), cardio-metabolic risk factors, motivation to walk, and well-being, and these measures were taken at baseline and post-intervention. The results supported intervention feasibility. Preliminary efficacy evidence was mixed. Markers of cardio-metabolic risk improved in the enhanced treatment only. Autonomous motivation increased in both conditions. There were no changes in step counts, standing, and sitting time, or well-being. Further fine tuning is needed before a definitive RCT.Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12618000807257.

KW - peer leader

KW - motivational training

KW - self-determination theory

KW - physical activity

U2 - 10.1016/j.cct.2020.105969

DO - 10.1016/j.cct.2020.105969

M3 - Article

VL - 91

JO - Contemporary Clinical Trials

JF - Contemporary Clinical Trials

SN - 1551-7144

M1 - 105969

ER -