Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing for adults with intellectual disabilities: Process issues from an acceptability study

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@article{d3f03bca717b4adc8ccefd01be9c6832,
title = "Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing for adults with intellectual disabilities: Process issues from an acceptability study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is recommended for post-traumatic stress disorder and emerging evidence indicates that it is effective for people with intellectual disabilities. However, acceptability from the perspectives of clients with intellectual disabilities, their therapists and other key people has not been formally evaluated. This study investigates process issues in the implementation of EMDR from perspectives of multiple stakeholders.METHOD: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with two adults with intellectual disabilities and three clinical psychologists who had participated in EMDR as well as a key supporter (N = 6) to provide information relating to three cases. The interviews were analysed thematically either directly from the audio recording or from transcripts.RESULTS: Five themes were identified: EMDR feels very different; EMDR is a technical process; the need to work with the present; talking is important; cautious optimism.CONCLUSIONS: Whilst a range of client- and therapist-related factors served as barriers to using EMDR in this small-scale study, such as preferences in working with the present and inexperienced therapists, there was cautious optimism that EMDR may be useful for {"}the right person at the right time.{"}.",
keywords = "eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, mental health problems, post-traumatic stress disorder, therapy, trauma",
author = "Gemma Unwin and Sara Willott and Stacey Hendrickson and {Stenfert Kroese}, Biza",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2019",
month = may
doi = "10.1111/jar.12557",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "635--647",
journal = "Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities",
issn = "1360-2322",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing for adults with intellectual disabilities

T2 - Process issues from an acceptability study

AU - Unwin, Gemma

AU - Willott, Sara

AU - Hendrickson, Stacey

AU - Stenfert Kroese, Biza

N1 - © 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2019/5

Y1 - 2019/5

N2 - BACKGROUND: Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is recommended for post-traumatic stress disorder and emerging evidence indicates that it is effective for people with intellectual disabilities. However, acceptability from the perspectives of clients with intellectual disabilities, their therapists and other key people has not been formally evaluated. This study investigates process issues in the implementation of EMDR from perspectives of multiple stakeholders.METHOD: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with two adults with intellectual disabilities and three clinical psychologists who had participated in EMDR as well as a key supporter (N = 6) to provide information relating to three cases. The interviews were analysed thematically either directly from the audio recording or from transcripts.RESULTS: Five themes were identified: EMDR feels very different; EMDR is a technical process; the need to work with the present; talking is important; cautious optimism.CONCLUSIONS: Whilst a range of client- and therapist-related factors served as barriers to using EMDR in this small-scale study, such as preferences in working with the present and inexperienced therapists, there was cautious optimism that EMDR may be useful for "the right person at the right time.".

AB - BACKGROUND: Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is recommended for post-traumatic stress disorder and emerging evidence indicates that it is effective for people with intellectual disabilities. However, acceptability from the perspectives of clients with intellectual disabilities, their therapists and other key people has not been formally evaluated. This study investigates process issues in the implementation of EMDR from perspectives of multiple stakeholders.METHOD: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with two adults with intellectual disabilities and three clinical psychologists who had participated in EMDR as well as a key supporter (N = 6) to provide information relating to three cases. The interviews were analysed thematically either directly from the audio recording or from transcripts.RESULTS: Five themes were identified: EMDR feels very different; EMDR is a technical process; the need to work with the present; talking is important; cautious optimism.CONCLUSIONS: Whilst a range of client- and therapist-related factors served as barriers to using EMDR in this small-scale study, such as preferences in working with the present and inexperienced therapists, there was cautious optimism that EMDR may be useful for "the right person at the right time.".

KW - eye movement desensitization and reprocessing

KW - mental health problems

KW - post-traumatic stress disorder

KW - therapy

KW - trauma

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85059896584&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jar.12557

DO - 10.1111/jar.12557

M3 - Article

C2 - 30632662

VL - 32

SP - 635

EP - 647

JO - Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities

JF - Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities

SN - 1360-2322

IS - 3

ER -