Evolutionary rewiring of bacterial regulatory networks

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

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Evolutionary rewiring of bacterial regulatory networks. / Taylor, Tiffany B.; Mulley, Geraldine; McGuffin, Liam J.; Johnson, Louise J.; Brockhurst, Michael A.; Arseneault, Tanya; Silby, Mark W.; Jackson, Robert W.

In: Microbial Cell, Vol. 2, No. 7, 06.07.2015, p. 256-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Harvard

Taylor, TB, Mulley, G, McGuffin, LJ, Johnson, LJ, Brockhurst, MA, Arseneault, T, Silby, MW & Jackson, RW 2015, 'Evolutionary rewiring of bacterial regulatory networks', Microbial Cell, vol. 2, no. 7, pp. 256-258. https://doi.org/10.15698/mic2015.07.215

APA

Taylor, T. B., Mulley, G., McGuffin, L. J., Johnson, L. J., Brockhurst, M. A., Arseneault, T., Silby, M. W., & Jackson, R. W. (2015). Evolutionary rewiring of bacterial regulatory networks. Microbial Cell, 2(7), 256-258. https://doi.org/10.15698/mic2015.07.215

Vancouver

Taylor TB, Mulley G, McGuffin LJ, Johnson LJ, Brockhurst MA, Arseneault T et al. Evolutionary rewiring of bacterial regulatory networks. Microbial Cell. 2015 Jul 6;2(7):256-258. https://doi.org/10.15698/mic2015.07.215

Author

Taylor, Tiffany B. ; Mulley, Geraldine ; McGuffin, Liam J. ; Johnson, Louise J. ; Brockhurst, Michael A. ; Arseneault, Tanya ; Silby, Mark W. ; Jackson, Robert W. / Evolutionary rewiring of bacterial regulatory networks. In: Microbial Cell. 2015 ; Vol. 2, No. 7. pp. 256-258.

Bibtex

@article{25e020040a93453bb92a294ee6010c7b,
title = "Evolutionary rewiring of bacterial regulatory networks",
abstract = "Bacteria have evolved complex regulatory networks that enable integration of multiple intracellular and extracellular signals to coordinate responses to environmental changes. However, our knowledge of how regulatory systems function and evolve is still relatively limited. There is often extensive homology between components of different networks, due to past cycles of gene duplication, divergence, and horizontal gene transfer, raising the possibility of cross-talk or redundancy. Consequently, evolutionary resilience is built into gene networks – homology between regulators can potentially allow rapid rescue of lost regulatory function across distant regions of the genome. In our recent study [Taylor, et al. Science (2015), 347(6225)] we find that mutations that facilitate cross-talk between pathways can contribute to gene network evolution, but that such mutations come with severe pleiotropic costs. Arising from this work are a number of questions surrounding how this phenomenon occurs.",
keywords = "Bacterial motility, Enhancing binding proteins, Flagella regulation, Gene network evolution, Nitrogen regulation",
author = "Taylor, {Tiffany B.} and Geraldine Mulley and McGuffin, {Liam J.} and Johnson, {Louise J.} and Brockhurst, {Michael A.} and Tanya Arseneault and Silby, {Mark W.} and Jackson, {Robert W.}",
year = "2015",
month = jul,
day = "6",
doi = "10.15698/mic2015.07.215",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "256--258",
journal = "Microbial cell factories",
issn = "1475-2859",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evolutionary rewiring of bacterial regulatory networks

AU - Taylor, Tiffany B.

AU - Mulley, Geraldine

AU - McGuffin, Liam J.

AU - Johnson, Louise J.

AU - Brockhurst, Michael A.

AU - Arseneault, Tanya

AU - Silby, Mark W.

AU - Jackson, Robert W.

PY - 2015/7/6

Y1 - 2015/7/6

N2 - Bacteria have evolved complex regulatory networks that enable integration of multiple intracellular and extracellular signals to coordinate responses to environmental changes. However, our knowledge of how regulatory systems function and evolve is still relatively limited. There is often extensive homology between components of different networks, due to past cycles of gene duplication, divergence, and horizontal gene transfer, raising the possibility of cross-talk or redundancy. Consequently, evolutionary resilience is built into gene networks – homology between regulators can potentially allow rapid rescue of lost regulatory function across distant regions of the genome. In our recent study [Taylor, et al. Science (2015), 347(6225)] we find that mutations that facilitate cross-talk between pathways can contribute to gene network evolution, but that such mutations come with severe pleiotropic costs. Arising from this work are a number of questions surrounding how this phenomenon occurs.

AB - Bacteria have evolved complex regulatory networks that enable integration of multiple intracellular and extracellular signals to coordinate responses to environmental changes. However, our knowledge of how regulatory systems function and evolve is still relatively limited. There is often extensive homology between components of different networks, due to past cycles of gene duplication, divergence, and horizontal gene transfer, raising the possibility of cross-talk or redundancy. Consequently, evolutionary resilience is built into gene networks – homology between regulators can potentially allow rapid rescue of lost regulatory function across distant regions of the genome. In our recent study [Taylor, et al. Science (2015), 347(6225)] we find that mutations that facilitate cross-talk between pathways can contribute to gene network evolution, but that such mutations come with severe pleiotropic costs. Arising from this work are a number of questions surrounding how this phenomenon occurs.

KW - Bacterial motility

KW - Enhancing binding proteins

KW - Flagella regulation

KW - Gene network evolution

KW - Nitrogen regulation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068481531&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.15698/mic2015.07.215

DO - 10.15698/mic2015.07.215

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:85068481531

VL - 2

SP - 256

EP - 258

JO - Microbial cell factories

JF - Microbial cell factories

SN - 1475-2859

IS - 7

ER -