Environment-wide association study (EWAS) to identify factors associated with hematocrit: evidence from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

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Environment-wide association study (EWAS) to identify factors associated with hematocrit: evidence from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. / Y, Zhong,; Jiang, C. Q.; Cheng, Kar; Zhang, W. S.; Jin, Y L; Lam, TH; Woo, J; Leung, GM; Schooling, CM.

In: Annals of Epidemiology, Vol. 26, No. 9, 09.2016, p. 638-642.

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Y, Zhong, ; Jiang, C. Q. ; Cheng, Kar ; Zhang, W. S. ; Jin, Y L ; Lam, TH ; Woo, J ; Leung, GM ; Schooling, CM. / Environment-wide association study (EWAS) to identify factors associated with hematocrit: evidence from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. In: Annals of Epidemiology. 2016 ; Vol. 26, No. 9. pp. 638-642.

Bibtex

@article{f9cd7bcaeb03497bb117a09a6780b213,
title = "Environment-wide association study (EWAS) to identify factors associated with hematocrit: evidence from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study",
abstract = "Purpose: In randomized controlled trials reducing high hematocrit (Hct) in patients with polycythemia vera protects against CVD events, whilst increasing Hct in anemia patients causes CVD events. Hct is influenced by environmental and life style factors. Given the limited knowledge concerning the drivers of Hct, we took an approach to identifying drivers of Hct.Methods: We used an environment-wide association study (EWAS) to identify environmental and life style factors associated with Hct in 20443 older Chinese adults (mean age=62.7 years) from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. We evaluated the role of 25 nutrients, 40 environmental contaminants, 2 metals (only available for 10405 participants) and 6 life-style factors in relation to Hct, adjusted for sex, age, recruitment phase and social-economic position. Results: In a mutually adjusted model vitamin A, serum calcium, serum magnesium and alcohol use were associated with higher Hct while physical activity was associated with lower Hct.Conclusion: Despite the difficulty of ascertaining causality, finding both expected (vitamin A and physical inactivity) and novel factors (serum calcium, serum magnesium and alcohol use) strongly associated with Hct illustrates the utility of EWAS to generate hypotheses regarding the potential contribution of modifiable exposures to CVD.",
keywords = "cardiovascular disease, Chinese, coagulability, environment-wide association study, hematocrit",
author = "Zhong, Y and Jiang, {C. Q.} and Kar Cheng and Zhang, {W. S.} and Jin, {Y L} and TH Lam and J Woo and GM Leung and CM Schooling",
year = "2016",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1016/j.annepidem.2016.07.005",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "638--642",
journal = "Annals of Epidemiology",
issn = "1047-2797",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Environment-wide association study (EWAS) to identify factors associated with hematocrit: evidence from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

AU - Y, Zhong,

AU - Jiang, C. Q.

AU - Cheng, Kar

AU - Zhang, W. S.

AU - Jin, Y L

AU - Lam, TH

AU - Woo, J

AU - Leung, GM

AU - Schooling, CM

PY - 2016/9

Y1 - 2016/9

N2 - Purpose: In randomized controlled trials reducing high hematocrit (Hct) in patients with polycythemia vera protects against CVD events, whilst increasing Hct in anemia patients causes CVD events. Hct is influenced by environmental and life style factors. Given the limited knowledge concerning the drivers of Hct, we took an approach to identifying drivers of Hct.Methods: We used an environment-wide association study (EWAS) to identify environmental and life style factors associated with Hct in 20443 older Chinese adults (mean age=62.7 years) from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. We evaluated the role of 25 nutrients, 40 environmental contaminants, 2 metals (only available for 10405 participants) and 6 life-style factors in relation to Hct, adjusted for sex, age, recruitment phase and social-economic position. Results: In a mutually adjusted model vitamin A, serum calcium, serum magnesium and alcohol use were associated with higher Hct while physical activity was associated with lower Hct.Conclusion: Despite the difficulty of ascertaining causality, finding both expected (vitamin A and physical inactivity) and novel factors (serum calcium, serum magnesium and alcohol use) strongly associated with Hct illustrates the utility of EWAS to generate hypotheses regarding the potential contribution of modifiable exposures to CVD.

AB - Purpose: In randomized controlled trials reducing high hematocrit (Hct) in patients with polycythemia vera protects against CVD events, whilst increasing Hct in anemia patients causes CVD events. Hct is influenced by environmental and life style factors. Given the limited knowledge concerning the drivers of Hct, we took an approach to identifying drivers of Hct.Methods: We used an environment-wide association study (EWAS) to identify environmental and life style factors associated with Hct in 20443 older Chinese adults (mean age=62.7 years) from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. We evaluated the role of 25 nutrients, 40 environmental contaminants, 2 metals (only available for 10405 participants) and 6 life-style factors in relation to Hct, adjusted for sex, age, recruitment phase and social-economic position. Results: In a mutually adjusted model vitamin A, serum calcium, serum magnesium and alcohol use were associated with higher Hct while physical activity was associated with lower Hct.Conclusion: Despite the difficulty of ascertaining causality, finding both expected (vitamin A and physical inactivity) and novel factors (serum calcium, serum magnesium and alcohol use) strongly associated with Hct illustrates the utility of EWAS to generate hypotheses regarding the potential contribution of modifiable exposures to CVD.

KW - cardiovascular disease

KW - Chinese

KW - coagulability

KW - environment-wide association study

KW - hematocrit

U2 - 10.1016/j.annepidem.2016.07.005

DO - 10.1016/j.annepidem.2016.07.005

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 638

EP - 642

JO - Annals of Epidemiology

JF - Annals of Epidemiology

SN - 1047-2797

IS - 9

ER -