Effect of Phosphorous Segregation on Fracture Properties of 2.25Cr-1Mo Pressure Vessel Steel

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@article{1839e5189d3c4276bf74759d1e61c96f,
title = "Effect of Phosphorous Segregation on Fracture Properties of 2.25Cr-1Mo Pressure Vessel Steel",
abstract = "Phosphorus is a very common trace element that can segregate at prior austenite grain boundaries and/or carbide/matrix interfaces of low alloy steels at high temperature (e.g., order of 500 degreesC) and adversely affect the fracture properties. This paper investigates segregation of P during reversible temper embrittlement (96 h at 520 degreesC) of quenched and fully tempered 2.25Cr-1Mo steel by Auger electron spectroscopy and describes the segregation mechanism. This paper also describes the effect of P segregation on fracture resistance and fracture mode of unembrittled steels, respectively, by fracture toughness testing over a temperature range of -196 degreesC to 20 degreesC and fractography in scanning electron microscopes. During temper embrittlement phosphorus segregation has been attributed due to the mechanism of {"}carbide rejection{"}. This segregation caused a reduction in fracture toughness values of the quenched and tempered steels at all test temperatures and an increase in the transition temperature. Phosphorus segregation also changed the brittle fracture micromechanism of quenched and fully tempered samples from one of transgranular cleavage to a mixed mode of fracture (transgranular cleavage and intergranular decohesion). The micromechanism of fracture at temperatures from the upper shelf, however, remained almost unchanged.",
keywords = "transition temperature, fracture toughness, carbide rejection, cleavage, intergranular decohesion",
author = "M Islam and Milorad Novovic and Paul Bowen and John Knott",
year = "2003",
month = jun,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1361/105994903770343079",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "244--248",
journal = "Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance",
issn = "1059-9495",
publisher = "ASM International",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of Phosphorous Segregation on Fracture Properties of 2.25Cr-1Mo Pressure Vessel Steel

AU - Islam, M

AU - Novovic, Milorad

AU - Bowen, Paul

AU - Knott, John

PY - 2003/6/1

Y1 - 2003/6/1

N2 - Phosphorus is a very common trace element that can segregate at prior austenite grain boundaries and/or carbide/matrix interfaces of low alloy steels at high temperature (e.g., order of 500 degreesC) and adversely affect the fracture properties. This paper investigates segregation of P during reversible temper embrittlement (96 h at 520 degreesC) of quenched and fully tempered 2.25Cr-1Mo steel by Auger electron spectroscopy and describes the segregation mechanism. This paper also describes the effect of P segregation on fracture resistance and fracture mode of unembrittled steels, respectively, by fracture toughness testing over a temperature range of -196 degreesC to 20 degreesC and fractography in scanning electron microscopes. During temper embrittlement phosphorus segregation has been attributed due to the mechanism of "carbide rejection". This segregation caused a reduction in fracture toughness values of the quenched and tempered steels at all test temperatures and an increase in the transition temperature. Phosphorus segregation also changed the brittle fracture micromechanism of quenched and fully tempered samples from one of transgranular cleavage to a mixed mode of fracture (transgranular cleavage and intergranular decohesion). The micromechanism of fracture at temperatures from the upper shelf, however, remained almost unchanged.

AB - Phosphorus is a very common trace element that can segregate at prior austenite grain boundaries and/or carbide/matrix interfaces of low alloy steels at high temperature (e.g., order of 500 degreesC) and adversely affect the fracture properties. This paper investigates segregation of P during reversible temper embrittlement (96 h at 520 degreesC) of quenched and fully tempered 2.25Cr-1Mo steel by Auger electron spectroscopy and describes the segregation mechanism. This paper also describes the effect of P segregation on fracture resistance and fracture mode of unembrittled steels, respectively, by fracture toughness testing over a temperature range of -196 degreesC to 20 degreesC and fractography in scanning electron microscopes. During temper embrittlement phosphorus segregation has been attributed due to the mechanism of "carbide rejection". This segregation caused a reduction in fracture toughness values of the quenched and tempered steels at all test temperatures and an increase in the transition temperature. Phosphorus segregation also changed the brittle fracture micromechanism of quenched and fully tempered samples from one of transgranular cleavage to a mixed mode of fracture (transgranular cleavage and intergranular decohesion). The micromechanism of fracture at temperatures from the upper shelf, however, remained almost unchanged.

KW - transition temperature

KW - fracture toughness

KW - carbide rejection

KW - cleavage

KW - intergranular decohesion

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037524356&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1361/105994903770343079

DO - 10.1361/105994903770343079

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 244

EP - 248

JO - Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance

JF - Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance

SN - 1059-9495

IS - 3

ER -