Ectogenesis and the case against the right to the death of the foetus

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Ectogenesis and the case against the right to the death of the foetus. / Blackshaw, Bruce P.; Rodger, Daniel.

In: Bioethics, Vol. 33, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 76-81.

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Blackshaw, Bruce P. ; Rodger, Daniel. / Ectogenesis and the case against the right to the death of the foetus. In: Bioethics. 2019 ; Vol. 33, No. 1. pp. 76-81.

Bibtex

@article{a73cc84043f7453ca60da00919a3cb2d,
title = "Ectogenesis and the case against the right to the death of the foetus",
abstract = "Ectogenesis, or the use of an artificial womb to allow a foetus to develop, will likely become a reality within a few decades, and could significantly affect the abortion debate. We first examine the implications for Judith Jarvis Thomson{\textquoteright}s violinist analogy, which argues for a woman{\textquoteright}s right to withdraw life support from the foetus and so terminate her pregnancy, even if the foetus is granted full moral status. We show that on Thomson{\textquoteright}s reasoning, there is no right to the death of the foetus, and abortion is not permissible if ectogenesis is available, provided it is safe and inexpensive. This raises the question of whether there are persuasive reasons for the right to the death of the foetus that could be exercised in the context of ectogenesis. Eric Mathison and Jeremy Davis have examined several arguments for this right, doubting that it exists, while Joona R{\"a}s{\"a}nen has recently criticized their reasoning. We respond to R{\"a}s{\"a}nen{\textquoteright}s analysis, concluding that his arguments are unsuccessful, and that there is no right to the death of the foetus in these circumstances.",
keywords = "Abortion, Ectogenesis, Foetus, Infanticide, Moral status, Pregnancy",
author = "Blackshaw, {Bruce P.} and Daniel Rodger",
note = "Blackshaw BP, Rodger D. Ectogenesis and the case against the right to the death of the foetus. Bioethics. 2019;33:76–81. https://doi.org/10.1111/bioe.12529",
year = "2019",
month = jan
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/bioe.12529",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "76--81",
journal = "Bioethics",
issn = "0269-9702",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ectogenesis and the case against the right to the death of the foetus

AU - Blackshaw, Bruce P.

AU - Rodger, Daniel

N1 - Blackshaw BP, Rodger D. Ectogenesis and the case against the right to the death of the foetus. Bioethics. 2019;33:76–81. https://doi.org/10.1111/bioe.12529

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Ectogenesis, or the use of an artificial womb to allow a foetus to develop, will likely become a reality within a few decades, and could significantly affect the abortion debate. We first examine the implications for Judith Jarvis Thomson’s violinist analogy, which argues for a woman’s right to withdraw life support from the foetus and so terminate her pregnancy, even if the foetus is granted full moral status. We show that on Thomson’s reasoning, there is no right to the death of the foetus, and abortion is not permissible if ectogenesis is available, provided it is safe and inexpensive. This raises the question of whether there are persuasive reasons for the right to the death of the foetus that could be exercised in the context of ectogenesis. Eric Mathison and Jeremy Davis have examined several arguments for this right, doubting that it exists, while Joona Räsänen has recently criticized their reasoning. We respond to Räsänen’s analysis, concluding that his arguments are unsuccessful, and that there is no right to the death of the foetus in these circumstances.

AB - Ectogenesis, or the use of an artificial womb to allow a foetus to develop, will likely become a reality within a few decades, and could significantly affect the abortion debate. We first examine the implications for Judith Jarvis Thomson’s violinist analogy, which argues for a woman’s right to withdraw life support from the foetus and so terminate her pregnancy, even if the foetus is granted full moral status. We show that on Thomson’s reasoning, there is no right to the death of the foetus, and abortion is not permissible if ectogenesis is available, provided it is safe and inexpensive. This raises the question of whether there are persuasive reasons for the right to the death of the foetus that could be exercised in the context of ectogenesis. Eric Mathison and Jeremy Davis have examined several arguments for this right, doubting that it exists, while Joona Räsänen has recently criticized their reasoning. We respond to Räsänen’s analysis, concluding that his arguments are unsuccessful, and that there is no right to the death of the foetus in these circumstances.

KW - Abortion

KW - Ectogenesis

KW - Foetus

KW - Infanticide

KW - Moral status

KW - Pregnancy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85055314759&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/bioe.12529

DO - 10.1111/bioe.12529

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 76

EP - 81

JO - Bioethics

JF - Bioethics

SN - 0269-9702

IS - 1

ER -